Chasing Genius

National Geographic launched the CHASING GENIUS CHALLENGE, calling for ideas to change the world by addressing three critical issues:

SUSTAINABLE PLANET | WORLD HEALTH | FEEDING 9 BILLION

I’ve created this page to house the citations and sources for the information I covered in my one-minute video submissions as well as provide additional resources for anyone wanting to know more.

The Transparency Projects Proposal Overview

My name is Emily Moran Barwick and I’m an educational activist and creator of BiteSizeVegan.com, a website and YouTube channel with over 350 (and counting) videos, articles, and speech recordings addressing the largest singular factor impacting our planet, world health and world hunger: animal agriculture.

The power to make profound change lies within each of us—and open access to solid information is the key to unlocking this potential and solving the greatest challenges facing our species.

Genius doesn’t happen in isolation. There are so many brilliant minds with world-changing potential—unrealized simply because they don’t have access to the building blocks of brilliance: information.

I believe free, open access to solid information is a necessity for solving the greatest challenges facing our species—even the sharpest minds can’t find solutions without having all of the facts.

My IDEA for change is the Transparency Projects: An interactive map-based website, wiki, and mobile app, housing information impacting the environment, public health, and world hunger, with a submission process for anyone to contribute to this living library of resources for world-changers.

Additionally, an automated chat-like Q&A interface—also available as an independent mobile app and present on BiteSizeVegan.com as well—would interpret conversational questions and return relevant information and resources.

This puts vital, right-to-know information right where it should be: at your fingertips, all together making accessing years of research as easy as clicking a map marker or sending a text message. The impact of accessible information multiplies exponentially.

The money from Chasing Genius would go towards hiring help realizing these Projects, including: Development, Design, Distribution, Volunteer Coordination, Technical Support, Platforms/Apps Maintenance, and Community Translation Capability.

My sincerest thanks to National Geographic for this opportunity.

Please navigate through the tabs at the top of this page for more information about how the Transparency Projects concept applies to each of these issues.

You may also visit my main website for hundreds of free videos, articles, reports and resources addressing these areas and much more. Please note the site is currently under construction to increase user accessibility dynamic navigation and search—pardon the mess!

I’ve also linked to specific relevant/related videos within each of the issues’ tabs above.

Note: National Geographic and CHASING GENIUS CHALLENGE are copyrights of National Geographic Partners, LLC. I do not claim any ownership of these terms and use them here purely for explanatory purposes.

Sustainable Planet

Everything Wrong With Environmentalism:

An Interactive Digital Transparency Project


VIEW THE ONE-MINUTE VIDEO SUBMISSION

Note: The Chasing Genius website had an error during submission upload resulting in my video submission for this category not processing correctly. Find citations & further resources below.


Animal agriculture is the single most devastating force behind our planet’s environmental collapse. Yet it remains largely unaddressed and even actively denied by environmental organizations—leaving the public with an inaccurate understanding of the true impact of our everyday actions. Animal agriculture:

  • Is the leading cause of climate change[11]
  • Is responsible for up to 51% of GHG emissions compared to the 13% of all global transportation.[12]
  • Uses 1/3 of the earth’s fresh water[13][14][15][16]
  • Occupies up to 45% of the Earth’s land[17][18]
  • Is responsible for 91% of Amazon rainforest destruction with 1-2 acres cleared every second.[19][20]
  • Is a leading cause of species extinction, ocean dead zones, and habitat destruction.[2][3][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31]

Even if we completely stopped all use of gas, oil, fuel, electricity, et cetera, and never used them ever again, we would still exceed our carbon equivalent greenhouse gas emissions of 565 Gigatons by the year 2030 just with the impact of “livestock” alone.[89][90]


The Transparency Projects will bring vital, right-to-know information to the public via an interactive map-based website, wiki, and mobile app allowing easy access to scientific studies, governmental and industry reports, advisories, and more, including—but not limited to—on the environmental front:

  • The location and annual manure output of waste lagoons and impact on the health of residents in surrounding neighborhoods [1][2][3][4]
  • Farm and industry violations and illegal dumping history and status[5][6]
  • Governmental and taxpayer subsidy recipients with the ability to cross-reference violation history and status.[7][5]
  • Records of health code/safety/environmental/welfare violations and resulting (or lack of) penalties [6]
  • Ground water status and safety [4][7]
  • Industry legalized “standard practices” impacting the environment [6][8][9]

In addition, an automated chat-like Q&A interface, also available as an independent mobile app, would interpret conversational questions and return relevant information and resources.



The Problem

The following are selected excerpts from some of the 350+ (and counting) videos, articles, and speech recordings on BiteSizeVegan.com. Please click on the title of each to expand its accordion. Clickable inked citations appear at the base of this page.

From “The Extremism of Veganism | Exposing The Greatest Lie”

See the full video and article here.

When it comes to the environment, we hear about conserving water, cutting down on emissions, halting deforestation. Environmental protection agencies encourage us to take shorter showers, carpool or ride our bikes, go paperless and recycle more. Our governments hold international conferences to address climate change and seek solutions.

All the while the single most devastating force behind our planet’s environmental collapse remains not only unspoken, but actually actively denied by the very organizations charged with saving our planet.[10]

Animal agriculture is the leading cause of climate change.[11] It’s responsible for up to 51 percent of GHG emissions compared to the 13 percent of all global transportation.[12] It uses a third of the earth’s fresh water,[13][14][15][16] up to 45 percent of the Earth’s land,[17][18] is responsible for 91 percent of Amazon rainforest destruction with 1-2 acres cleared every second.[19][20] It is also a leading cause of species extinction, ocean dead zones, and habitat destruction.[21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31]

The efforts we make to recycle and take shorter showers are rather insignificant in comparison. Accounting for variation in production system, the global average water footprint for a single pound of beef is 1,847 gallons/lb, with numbers ranging all the way to 8,000 gallons/lb.[32][33][34]

This is where many people point to small, local farms, and sustainable practices. Like grass fed beef. Or free-range eggs. The truth is we don’t have the land. The land required to feed 1 vegan for 1 year is 1/6th acre. It takes 3 times as much for a vegetarian, meaning someone who consumes dairy and eggs but no meat, and 18 times as much for a meat-eater.[35][36]

You can grow 15 times more protein on any given area of land with plants versus animal

On top of all of that, studies show that pasture-raised cows emit 40-60% more greenhouse gases than grain-fed.[37]

Whether you eat fish and marine life or not, this matter impacts all of us. The ocean, or rather the phytoplankton within the ocean, provides somewhere between 50 and 80% of our oxygen[38][39][40] and the oceans ecosystems store carbon in massive quantities.[41]

Since we tend to go for the biggest fish first, only 10% of predatory fish species remain,[42] which could leave the unchecked species to feed on the ocean’s vegetation releasing the stored carbon. Losing just 1% of these blue carbon ecosystems would be equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of Australia.[43][44]

We pull 90-100 million tonnes[45] of fish from our oceans each year[46][47] with some sources even estimating 150 million tonnes.[48] There is no way for the marine populations to replenish themselves.

Our industrial fishing methods are incredibly inefficient, with some operations throwing 98% of their catches overboard, dead,[49][50] because they aren’t the targeted species.

As I said earlier, land-based animal agriculture is the leading cause of ocean dead zones, which are areas in the ocean starved of oxygen such that marine life suffocates and dies.

So the animals we are raising for food on land are killing the animals we are ripping from the ocean. And to add a further layer of perversity, we are feeding the fish we catch to the cows, pigs, chickens, and other land animals and to the fish we farm.

When humanity is decimating habitats, consuming land and resources, polluting the oceans, destroying the rainforest, driving species after species into extinction, feeding plants that we could eat to animals and feeding other animals to animals that aren’t supposed to eat animals, all so that we can eventually eat the animals ourselves.

But of course as a consumer, we don’t see the trail. We see the pretty packages and sleek advertising. We see these ordinary, innocent, every day products. And we find comfort in the fact that most people eat the way we do; that most people don’t seem to be concerned. And we continue to believe the lie that this is the way it’s supposed to be.

Ethics aside, we have environmentally reached the point beyond personal choice–beyond “you eat how you want to eat and I’ll eat how I want to eat.” This is a global crisis and it’s not about you and it’s not about me anymore.

We say that children are our future but what future can they have when we are eating the planet to death? The world cannot sustain meat, dairy and egg production. It simply can’t. We have to start aligning our actions with our values.

From “Empty Oceans- Is The World Running Out Of Fish?”

See the full video and article here.

90-100 million tonnes[51] of fish are pulled from our oceans each year[52][53] with some sources even estimating 150 million tonnes.[54] and some scientists predict that we’ll see fishless oceans by 2048.[55][56][57][58][59][60]

Statistics on ocean life in general remain cloudy, both due to the practical difficulty of tracking marine life and the terminology used by the organizations. In their 2012 State of the World Fisheries and Aquaculture Report, the FAO found that 87.3% of fish stocks were fully exploited or overexploited.[61]

However, comparing this figure to the report before and after is no easy feat. Between their 2010 and 2012 reports, the FAO had reduced its level of exploitation terminology from 6[62] to 3 terms.[63][64] Now, in their most recent report from 2014,[65] they’ve further clouded the issue, replacing “exploited” with “fished” and introducing two vague categories termed “sustainable” and “unsustainable levels.” This terminology has the dual affect of both making the situation sound less dire and making comparison between the reports unnecessarily difficult.

But when you pick through the data and unravel the terminology, the bottom line is that as of the most current report, less than 10% of our world’s fisheries remain unexploited.

Trawling, the primary method used for shrimp, is often referred to as the ocean equivalent of clear-cutting rainforest with 80-98% of unintended catches being thrown back into the sea, dead.[66][67]

The removal of sharks may contribute to climate change by leaving the unchecked numbers of species to feast on the ocean’s vegetation, releasing the ancient carbon found there in massive quantities. “If we just lost 1 per cent of the oceans’ blue carbon ecosystems, it would be equivalent to releasing 460 million tonnes of carbon annually, which is about the equivalent of about 97 million cars. It’s about equivalent to Australia’s annual greenhouse gas emissions.”[68][69]

Animal agriculture is the leading cause of not only ocean dead zones, but also species extinction, water pollution, and habitat destruction, all of which severely impact our oceans.[70][71][72][73][74][75][76][77][78][79][80]

Today, the majority of wild-caught fish go to feed our farmed fish as well as our pigs, cows and chickens.[81] We kill over 2.8 trillion fish.[82] That’s 2.7 trillion more every year than the number of humans to have every existed in the history of our species.[83]

We have already gone beyond the point of being able to reverse the damage. As Dr. Richard Oppenlander states, “It has been 300 million years since the last time our oceans have been this warm and acidic, and at that time, it took over 30 million years to recover.”[84]

In addition to not acknowledging the main cause of water pollution, habitat destruction, species extinction and ocean dead zones, Oceana and other major ocean defense organizations propose that the solution to the decimation of ocean life is to eat sustainable seafood.[10]

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as sustainable seafood. With whales dying from starvation,[185][186] and 90% of all large fish species gone,[42] the ocean can’t even sustain itself, let alone the up to 150 million tonnes of sea life we pull from it every year. Additionally, sustainable seafood labels also don’t account for the greenhouse gas emissions caused by fishing.[187][188][41][189]

The 2013 State of the Ocean Report [85] from the IPSO stated, “Not only are we already experiencing severe declines in many species, to the point of commercial extinction in some cases, and an unparalleled rate of regional extinctions of habitat types … we now face losing marine species and entire marine ecosystems, such as coral reefs, within a single generation. Unless action is taken now, the consequences of our activities are at a high risk of causing – through the combined effects of climate change, overexploitation, pollution and habitat loss – the next globally significant extinction event in the ocean.”[86]

From “Everything Wrong With Environmentalism in 11 Minutes Or Less”

Note: This is a rapid-fire video with a more biting tone than most of my approaches. It’s meant to be fast-paced and a bit snarky in nature. Also, I wrote this prior to learning the citation software I currently use so this copy does not have full citations. They are present on the blog post. Revisiting older posts to redo the citations in a linked format and cite older works prior to any software know-how is on my to-do list!

See the full video and article here.

Issue One: Climate Change

Environmental agencies focus on fossil fuels as the big bad baddy of greenhouse gas emissions leading to global warming, suggesting alternative energy, carpooling, hybrid cars, and biking, but animal agriculture accounts for more CO2 per year than all transportation methods combined.

A conservative 2006 study by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Study[87] placed animal agriculture at 7,516 million tons per year or 18% of annual global GHG emissions with a far more thorough 2009 World Watch study[88] taking into account overlooked livestock respiration, land use, methane and other oversights of the FAO, with the ultimate outcome of at least 32,564 million tons of CO2 per year coming from animal agriculture. That’s 51% of all global emissions compared [to the 13% of all combined transportation.]

And what do the environmental agencies point to: reducing fossil fuel usage.

If we completely stopped all use of gas, oil, fuel, electricity, et cetera, and never used them ever again, we would still exceed our carbon equivalent greenhouse gas emissions of 565 Gigatons by the year 2030 just with the impact of livestock alone.[89][90] So not using fossil fuels at all, which would be the wet dream of every environmental agency, we’re still gassing out the planet with the one contributor, the main contributor, which they refuse to even address.

In a similar vein, the focus is always almost exclusively on CO2 but methane is 25-100 times more destructive than CO2 and has 86 times the global warming power.

If we do reduce the CO2 in the atmosphere as all the organizations call for, it will take around 100 years to see an actual decline, whereas reducing methane shows results almost immediately with significant results within decades. So the proposed solutions are even farther from the mark of actual constructive change.

Additionally, livestock is responsible for 65% of all emissions of nitrous oxide – a greenhouse gas which has 296 x more destructive than carbon dioxide and which stays in the atmosphere for 150 years.

Put in comparative terms, your average car produces 3-12 kg/day of CO2. To clear rainforest to produce beef for one hamburger produces 75 kg of CO2. Eating one pound of hamburger does the same damage as driving your car for more than three weeks.

But is animal agriculture ever mentioned by any of the top environmental organizations or environmentalists in relation to global warming? Nope. They focus on alternative energy when converting to wind and solar power will take 20+ years and roughly 43 trillion dollars, and going vegan takes seconds and can be even cheaper than being non-vegan.

Issue Two: Water Conservation

Environmental protection agencies recommend to use less water, take shorter showers, use a low flow shower head. Now here is where you’ll find the greatest variation from my original calculations based on a 5 gallon per minute shower head. This time around I found that the typical shower head after 1980 emits 2.5 gallons/minute with the low flow emitting no more than 2gpm. If you take daily 15 minute showers with a low-flow shower head you’ll be saving 2,737.5 gallons per year. If, instead, you forgo one pound of beef one time, you’ll save 2,500 gallons of water for ONE POUND OF BEEF. This is a conservative number as figure range all the way to over 8,000 gallons of water for one pound of beef.

477 gallons of water are required to produce 1lb. of eggs; almost 900 gallons of water are needed for 1lb. of cheese. and 1,000 gallons/liters of water are required to produce 1 gallon/liter of milk.

Environmental agencies focus almost exclusively on curbing home water usage, but only 5% of water consumed in the US is by private homes, while 55% of water consumed in the US is for animal agriculture, and 20-33% of all fresh water consumption in the world today. That’s up to a third of the planets water.

If you didn’t consume beef, eggs, milk, or cheese, not even counting other meats or dairy items, based on American consumption habits from 2000 [64.4lbs beef down from 80.9, 250 eggs down from 374, 29.8lbs cheese at an all-time high, and 22.6 gallons milk down from 36.4] and the conservative figures of water per pound, you’d save 222,345 gallons of water that year.

But the environmental agencies prefer saving 1,825-2,737.5 gallons a year by using a low flow shower-head.

Oh and the trendy little Greek Yogurts out there? 90 gallons of water for a single 6 oz. serving. And one stick of butter takes 109 gallons.

If we added in all forms of dairy and meat for the average American in 2000, which is less dairy and more meat than the data I had for my first video, and use a very conservative average of 1,500 gallons per pound for the remaining meat as each type varies and an even more conservative 600 gallons for the remaining dairy, a vegan year would save approximately 724,925 gallons.

Not only does that blow every water conservation recommendation out of the water, but with the new calculations, forget what I’ve said about not showering in the past- you would have to not shower AT ALL for over 66 years if you took daily 15 minute showers or close to a 100 years if you took daily 10 minute showers, both with a water saving shower head.

And the advice of the supposed environmental champions: shower less, turn off the water while soaping your hands, run your sprinklers at night. Because that’s how we’re going to change the world.

Issue Three: Fracking

Fracking is the new golden child of environmentalists and their leading organizations. Fracking is destroying the planet! It’s polluting the waters. In the United States alone, fracking uses from 70-140 billion gallons of water. Keep in mind for the big numbers that a thousand seconds is 17 minutes, a million seconds is 12 days, a billion seconds is 31.7 years, and a trillion seconds is 31,709.8 years.

In the United States alone, animal agriculture uses from 34-76 trillion gallons annually. Taking into account the exponential difference between a billion and a trillion, animal agriculture in the United States consumes anywhere from 486 to over 1,000 times more water than fracking, the largest threat to water according to environmentalists.

Issue Four: Ocean Dead Zones and Over-Fishing

Some of the worst human-created devastation is in our oceans. 3/4 of the world’s fisheries are exploited. 90 million tons of fish are pulled from our oceans each year. For every 1 pound of fish caught, up to 5 pounds of unintended marine species are caught and discarded as by-kill. We could see fishless oceans by 2048.

And what’s suggestion of the major ocean protection organizations? Sustainable fishing. There’s no way to make 100 million tons of fish by 2050 sustainable, especially given the 5 pounds of by catch for every one pound of fish.

Animal agriculture is the leading cause of ocean dead zones with livestock operations on land having created more than 500 nitrogen-flooded dead zones around the world in our oceans.

Issue Five: Waste Management

Environmental agencies focus on industrial waste and the disposal and sanitation of human waste while a farm with 2,500 dairy cows produces the same amount of waste as a city of 411,000 people and it is entirely untreated. In fact, every minute, 7 million pounds of excrement are produced by animals raised for food in the US. This doesn’t include the animals raised outside of USDA jurisdiction or in backyards, or the billions of fish raised in aquaculture settings in the US and it all has no proper management system leading to ground water and ocean pollution.

Perhaps they don’t want to address the fecal issue because they themselves are full of…moving on.

Issue Six: Species Extinction

10,000 years ago 99% of biomass (i.e. zoomass) was wild animals, today, humans and the animals that we raise as food make up 98% of the zoomass, with wild animals comprising only 2%. Up to137 plant, animal and insect species are lost every day due to rainforest destruction, the leading cause of which, as we shall see, is animal agriculture. We are currently facing the largest mass extinction in 65 million years.

The Alliance for Global Conservation estimates 36 percent of all species on our planet are in danger of extinction. And what are the major species protection organizations recommending? Wildlife rehabilitation and conservation, fighting poaching, and breeding programs. Way to throw a bandaid on an open artery. I’m sure it will hold.

Issue Seven: Habitat Destruction, Land Usage & Deforestation

1/3 of the planet is desertified, with livestock as the leading cause.

Nearly half of the contiguous US is devoted to animal agriculture.

1.5 acres can produce 37,000 pounds of plant-based food and only 375 pounds of meat.

The land required to feed 1 vegan for 1 year is 1/6th acre. It’s 3x as much for a vegetarian and 18x as much for a meat-eater.

You can grow 15x more protein on any given area of land with plants, rather than animals.

136 million rainforest acres have been cleared for animal agriculture with 1-2 acres of rainforest being cleared every second.

In fact animal agriculture is responsible for up to 91% of Amazon destruction.

A single quarter pounder burger takes 55 square feet of rainforest to produce.

But what do the major rainforest protection agencies focus on primarily? Palm oil and pulp production.

Now for the Too Long Didn’t Watch version:

Animal agriculture is the leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions leading to global warming, uses a third of the earth’s fresh water, up to 45% of the Earth’s land, is responsible for 91% of Amazon destruction with 1-2 acres being cleared every second, and is a leading cause of species extinction, ocean dead zones, and habitat destruction.

Environmental agencies not only do not focus on animal agriculture, the absolute most devastating and pervasive single cause of multi-dimensional environmental destruction, but they actually refuse to even acknowledge it. And individual environmentalists, by and large, perhaps as a consequence or by their own social indoctrination, aren’t even aware of this issue despite devoting themselves to championing the environment.

From “$30K Poop Nutrition Challenge! | Sponsored By Ben & Jerry’s”

Note: This video was written in a playful and sarcastic tone. Watching it with the accompanying visuals and verbal tone may be helpful. If you’re offended by allusions to toilet humor, perhaps skip this one. :)

The video looks at the sheer scope and environmental/health impacts of the waste produced by the animals we eat. The framing for this video was a contest called the “Nutrient Recycling Challenge $30K giveaway” put out by the EPA, USDA, WWF, NMPF, WERF, ASABE and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream (among others).

See the full video and article here.

Want to be a part of an exciting opportunity to save the planet, feed the world, and make some cash? Want to get in on the ground floor of a revolutionary re-imagining of epic proportions? Are you a problem-solver with earth-shattering-innovations to offer? Then answer the call of the Nutrient Recycling Challenge $30K giveaway, brought to you by such movers and shakers as the EPA, USDA, WWF, NMPF, WERF, ASABE…. AND BEN & JERRY’s ice cream!!

What’s that you say? What IS nutrient recycling? Well, let me tell you! It’s… it’s… trying to do something with all the poo…there’s too much poo.

If there’s one sure constant in this world, it’s that everyone poops. And while discussion of poo is a social taboo (couldn’t help myself) and some people act like theirs doesn’t stink—a sure sign they’re full of it—the biggest deuce denial of all is that surrounding the most monumental poo-producers of all time: farmed animals.

In the United States, for example—which is surprisingly not number one in number two[91][92][93]—it is estimated that livestock animals produce 130 times more waste than the human population—almost 1.4 billion tons [1.2–1.37].[94][95][96] That comes out to roughly 5 tons of farmed animal waste per U.S. citizen.[97]

With animal excrement piling up in the U.S. alone at an alarming-yet impressive rate of 116,000 lbs/sec, [52,616.715kg] meaning 7 million pounds/minute [3,175,146.6kg],[98][99][100] it’s safe to say we’re a bit up the proverbial creek without a paddle.

This astronomical amount of toxic waste is 100 times more concentrated than raw human sewage[101] and more than 500 times more concentrated than treated human sewage,[102] making it important to note that no treatment facilities exist nor are required for livestock waste.

The greatest offenders of all are pig and dairy farms, with a 2,500-head dairy cattle operation producing a waste load similar to a city of 61,000 people,[103] and the 35.1 million pigs slaughtered in 2015 by a single pork producer, Smithfield Farms, accounting for a very conservative estimate of 95.2 billion pounds [95,191,200,000lb / 43,178,002,011.144 kg] pounds of pig poo.[104][105][106] Check out this video for a showcase of Smithfield shoveling it on pretty thick with their public relations pork propaganda.

But where you may see a devastating health hazard of ground water contamination, air pollution, and antibiotic-resistant-pathogen proliferation, causing everything from respiratory illnesses to decreased lung function, to cardiovascular ailments and even premature death, or perhaps an environmental nightmare of nitrogen-flooded ocean dead zones, habitat destruction, and decimation of streams, tributaries, and wetlands, [107][108][109][110][111][112][113][114][115][116][117][118][119][120][121][122][123][124][125][126][127][128][129][130][131][132][133][134][135][136] the Environmental Protection Agency and it’s crew of—shockingly—pig and dairy farmers[137][138] see opportunity!

See, it’s not toxic waste, it’s “animal manure containing valuable nutrients.”[139]

It’s not a mounting global crisis, it’s “a tremendous opportunity to generate environmental and economic benefits from manure.”[140]

And it’s definitely not about the legal trouble industry leaders face with repeat violations of the Clean Water or Clean Air Acts, because obviously they’re launching this exciting challenge together with the EPA and USDA, the very organizations charged with regulating their illegal activities. [141][142][143][144][145] So obviously, everything’s great!

They’re not irresponsible entities pawning off their problems, they’re “the Seekers.”

And you’re not doing their job for them at a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of their salaries, you have the honor of being a “Solver.”[146]

[Thank goodness for euphemisms, the potpourri of vocabulary, perfect for masking the smell of impropriety!]

And certainly don’t worry about the fact that this miraculous manure, or nutrient goldmine, as it were, is typically a completely unbalanced fertilizer for plants, containing far too much phosphorous.[147]

And most of all, don’t be intimidated by the enormity of the problem, nor the fact that it long ago hit the proverbial fan.

All you have to do is suggest something better than the current system. Which is basically storing slurry in giant swimming pools of sewage called lagoons before literally launching it straight up into the air in glorious fecal fountains that put Las Vegas to shame and shower local residents with a refreshing mist of eau de poo.[148][149][150][151][152][153] In other words, the bar is low.

While phase I of submissions has already passed, the implementation of the lucky winners is yet to come. So hold onto the edge of your toilet seat—I know I will—to see where the excitement will lead!

While the United States is the only country I’m aware of that’s created an official challenge for dealing with it’s crap—which is, after all, the American way given our obsession with reality TV—yet another unstoppable influx of sh-ining examples of brilliant entertainment!—before you lay the stink of the world at America’s back door, it’s important to note that this is a global issue. From the gut of Germany, through the intestines of India, and fecal channels of China, into the bowels of Brazil, past the colon of Columbia, to the nether regions of the Netherlands, and out the a—nus of America, animals are everywhere, and every one of them poops.[154][155][156][157][158][159][160][161]

Now if you think this is just some craptastic video that I’m pulling out of my—well, y’know—rest assured that I’m nothing if not anal about my fecal facts.

Because regardless of the brevity of this bowel-movement-homage, I spent many hours performing a virtual investigative colonoscopy on the waste management world to ensure this sh-ow was tight. I’d encourage you to check out the blog post linked in the video description, where you’ll find links to my own mountain of shi-mmering citations and resources. And if you want to help me make more quality crap, feel free to join the Nugget Army where we shoot the sh- we schmooze on a regular basis.

From “The Best We Have To Offer”

Note: This is an excerpt from an in-depth speech I wrote for and delivered in Dublin, Ireland. While the speech largely focuses upon the impact of animal agriculture in the Republic of Ireland and the greater European Union, it provides a powerful case study for all audiences given Ireland’s status as one of the most idealized manifestations of “humane,” “sustainable” animal agriculture. Essentially, The Best We Have To Offer.

See the full video and article here.

Setting aside all arguments for animal ethics, the destructive nature of animal agriculture, the environmental crisis at hand should be on the forefront of Ireland’s agenda—too protect and preserve the incredible landscape of this country, in which its citizens take well-deserved pride. And while Ireland is the first country to implement a nation-wide sustainability program,[162][163] it unfortunately mirrors all of the major green initiatives and government panels the world over, proposing and celebrating symbolic gestures, essentially applying media-friendly Band-Aids to a severed limb.

Animal agriculture accounted for 34% of Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions in 2013, the single largest contributing sector.[164] It’s responsible for 97.5% of ammonia,[165] 89.2% of methane, and 94% nitrous oxide and[166] a greenhouse gas that is 296 times more destructive than carbon dioxide and which stays in the atmosphere for 150 years.[167]

Ireland had the 4th highest greenhouse gas emission per capita in 2011[168] The National Competitiveness Council reported in 2008 that the ROI was “one of the highest carbon emitters on a per capita basis in the OECD,” utilizing less than half the OECD average of renewable sources, with no waste to energy conversion, stating “the least preferred waste solution from an environmental perspective, dominates in Ireland.”[169] Their subsequent 2015 Scorecard, showed Ireland’s environmental performance (EPI score) and rate of improvement still lagging behind OECD average, with particularly poor performance “in relation to biodiversity and protection of habitats, fisheries and water sanitation.”[170]

Keep in mind this is the impact of the iconic, grass-fed, pasture-raised Irish agriculture. As it is, EPA documents show time and again the waste lagoons from pig and dairy farms and wastewater from rendering plants contaminating Ireland’s protected waters, and mislabeled or non-compliant handling of SRM materials, meaning remains at risk of containing mad-cow disease, directly threatening the public health.[171][172][173] [174]

The Irish Times reported the increasing environmental devastation of New Zealand’s dairy practice, saying how that country was “often held up as an example of what Ireland could have been if the milk quota regime had not pulled the handbrake on our growth.”[175] Twenty days later, the quote was lifted.[176]

Even if this approach was the ideal we hold it up to be, we simply don’t have the land for the number of animals we eat every year. The amount of land that it takes to produce 37,000 pounds of plant-based foods will only yield 375 pounds of meat.[177][178][179]

You can grow 15 times more protein on any given area of land with plants versus animals.[180]

We have environmentally reached the point beyond personal choice–beyond “you eat how you want to eat and I’ll eat how I want to eat.” This is a global crisis and it’s not about you and it’s not about me anymore.

We say that children are our future but what future can they have when we are eating the planet to death? The world cannot sustain meat, dairy and egg production. It simply can’t. We have to start aligning our actions with our values.

Whether you eat fish and marine life or not, this matter impacts all of us. The ocean, or rather the phytoplankton within the ocean, provides somewhere between 50 and 80% of our oxygen[181][182][183] and the oceans ecosystems store carbon in massive quantities—[184]we are destroying the very lungs of our planet with the delusion of sustainable fishing.

Proposed Solution

For the Chasing Genius Challenge, applications were asked to “Describe Your Solution.” Below is a summary of how the Transparency Projects would help address the mounting environmental crisis and help us collectively move towards truly sustainable living. Please also refer to the statement on the primary tab for more specifics on the Projects’ logistics.

Describe Your Solution

Everyone deserves to know the impact of their choices. Everyone deserves to have the opportunity to take action that is in line with their values, and chose not to support and engage in practices that decimate our planet, endanger our health and that of our family, take food from the hungry, and harm innocent beings.

While much of the legal and governmental documentation and regulations of the animal industries is publicly available, it’s made incredibly difficult to access and effectively navigate.

The public relies on media soundbites and distilled presentations which are rarely accurate. Most people do not have the time, resources, or ability to spend months researching in the depths of documentation, studies, legislation, investigations, and more.

The Transparency Projects—much like their sister endeavor BiteSizeVegan—will bring the information to the people in an accessible, approachable, navigable manner through location-based wiki-styled interface and mobile app along with a chat-like Q&A interface, putting right-to-know information right where it should be: at your fingertips, all together making accessing years of research as easy as clicking a map marker or sending a text message.

As I’ve said in many of my speeches around the world:

“We have environmentally reached the point beyond personal choice–beyond “you eat how you want to eat and I’ll eat how I want to eat.” This is a global crisis and it’s not about you and it’s not about me anymore

We say that children are our future but what future can they have when we are eating the planet to death? The world cannot sustain meat, dairy and egg production. It simply can’t. We have to start aligning our actions with our values.”




[1] For a humorous yet informative look into the “poo problem”—so to speak—with a focus on the United States, see: Emily Moran Barwick, “$30K Poop Nutrition Challenge! | Sponsored By Ben & Jerry’s,” Bite Size Vegan, May 30, 2016, http://bitesizevegan.com/environmental-societal-impact/30k-poop-nutrition-challenge-sponsored-by-ben-jerrys/.

[2] For a fast-paced tour through an environmental A-Z (including the Ps) see: Emily Moran Barwick, “Everything Wrong With Environmentalism In 11 Minutes Or Less,” BiteSizeVegan.Com, July 15, 2015, http://bitesizevegan.com/environmental-societal-impact/everything-wrong-with-environmentalism-in-11-minutes-or-less/.

[3] For an in-depth report on what the most current research says about the state of our oceans, see: Emily Moran Barwick, “EMPTY OCEANS: Is The World Running Out Of Fish?” (Bite Size Vegan, March 7, 2016), http://bitesizevegan.com/environmental-societal-impact/empty-oceans-is-the-world-running-out-of-fish/.

[4] For a case study on the impact of waste lagoons on our water, refer to the section on Lake Erie in this as-of-yet unpublished speech transcript. Note: Password is OHIO (case sensitive): Emily Moran Barwick, “Unpublished Transcript for Cleveland, Ohio Speech ‘You Have Been Lied To,’” Bite Size Vegan, June 4, 2017, http://bitesizevegan.com/clevelandveg/.

[5] This cross-posted meme demonstrates an example of social-media outreach with the information that will be housed and available through the Transparency Projects. As specified in the posts, the statistics mentioned in these posts (excepting Twitter due to character limits) were from the Follow The Manure Report: Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Facebook Post Example,” Bite Size Vegan Facebook Page, June 13, 2017, https://www.facebook.com/BiteSizeVegan/photos/a.326987104090591.1073741829.325985774190724/1213415542114405/?type=3; Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Instagram Post Example,” Bite Size Vegan Instagram, June 13, 2017, https://www.instagram.com/p/BVSyot5hmJy/; Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Twitter Post Example,” Tweet, BiteSizeVegan Twitter, (June 2, 2017), https://twitter.com/BiteSizeVegan/status/874735929512017921.

[6] For a thorough, in-depth case study of the actual impact of humane, health, and environmental regulations, and monitoring and enforcement, please see: Emily Moran Barwick, “The Best We Have To Offer? | Inside Ireland’s ‘Humane’ Farming” (Dublin, Ireland, September 28, 2016), http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-best-we-have-to-offer-inside-irelands-humane-farming/.

[7] This incredibly effective concept has been realized on a local scale by the Less=More Coalition of the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter. Their thorough report, which I referenced in my as-of-yet unpublished speech “You Have Been Lie To,” may be found here: Less=More Coalition and Sierra Club Michigan Chapter and SociallyResponsible Agricultural Project, “Follow the Manure [Report Documentation],” Sierra Club, November 17, 2015, http://www.sierraclub.org/michigan/follow-manure-factory-farms-and-lake-erie-algal-crisis Due to the projected and desired international scale of the Transparency Projects, I’ve researched alternative options to Google Maps and would ideally bring on a developer to custom code the platform and interface.

[8] For an engaging look at the extremism of veganism and apparent banality of everyday dietary practices, including the affect on the environment, see: Emily Moran Barwick, “The Extremism Of Veganism | Exposing The Greatest Lie [Speech] | Bite Size Vegan,” May 4, 2016, http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-extremism-of-veganism-exposing-the-greatest-lie-speech/.

[9] For a decidedly unique deconstruction of bestiality that takes a direction you won’t expect, see: Emily Moran Barwick, “Sex With Animals: The Blurred Lines of Bestiality,” Bite Size Vegan, January 27, 2017, http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/sex-with-animals-the-blurred-lines-of-bestiality/.

[10] Kip Anderson and Keegan Kuhn, Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret, 2014, http://www.cowspiracy.com.

[11] R. Anhang Goodland, “Livestock and Climate Change: What If the Key Actors in Climate Change Were Pigs, Chickens and Cows?” (Worldwatch Institute, December 2009), https://www.worldwatch.org/files/pdf/Livestock%20and%20Climate%20Change.pdf.

[12] “Livestock and Climate Change | Worldwatch Institute,” accessed March 12, 2016, http://www.worldwatch.org/node/6294.

[13] Mario Herrero et al., “Biomass Use, Production, Feed Efficiencies, and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Global Livestock Systems,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110, no. 52 (December 24, 2013): 20888–93, doi:10.1073/pnas.1308149110.

[14] “Forks Over Knives | Freshwater Abuse and Loss: Where Is It All Going?,” Forks Over Knives, May 20, 2013, http://www.forksoverknives.com/freshwater-abuse-and-loss-where-is-it-all-going/.

[15] Mesfin M. Mekonnen and Arjen Y. Hoekstra, “A Global Assessment of the Water Footprint of Farm Animal Products,” Ecosystems 15, no. 3 (April 2012): 401–15, doi:10.1007/s10021-011-9517-8.

[16] P. W. Gerbens-Leenes, M. M. Mekonnen, and A. Y. Hoekstra, “The Water Footprint of Poultry, Pork and Beef: A Comparative Study in Different Countries and Production Systems,” Water Resources and Industry, Water Footprint Assessment (WFA) for better water governance and sustainable development, 1–2 (March 2013): 25–36, doi:10.1016/j.wri.2013.03.001.

[17] Pete Smith, Mercedes Bustamante, and et al, “Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU),” accessed March 11, 2016, http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg3/ipcc_wg3_ar5_chapter11.pdf.

[18] Philip Thornton, Mario Herrero, and Polly Ericksen, “Livestock and Climate Change,” International Livestock Research Institute.[Cgspace. Cgiar. Org/Bitstream/Handle/10568/10601/IssueBrief3. Pdf], 2011, https://cgspace.cgiar.org/bitstream/handle/10568/10601/IssueBrief3.pdf.

[19] Dr Richard Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work (Minneapolis, MN: Langdon Street Press, 2013), http://amzn.to/1VJtAoO.

[20] Sérgio Margulis, Causes of Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon, World Bank Working Paper, no. 22 (Washington, D.C: World Bank, 2004), http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2004/02/02/000090341_20040202130625/Rendered/PDF/277150PAPER0wbwp0no1022.pdf.

[21] “PRESS RELEASE LOUISIANA UNIVERSITIES MARINE CONSORTIUM,” August 4, 2014, http://www.gulfhypoxia.net/research/shelfwide%20cruises/2014/hypoxia_press_release_2014.pdf.

[22] EarthTalk, “What Causes Ocean ‘Dead Zones’?,” Scientific American, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ocean-dead-zones/.

[23] Environmental Protection Agency, “What’s the Problem? | Animal Waste | Region 9 | US EPA,” accessed February 27, 2016, http://www3.epa.gov/region9/animalwaste/problem.html#main.

[24] Henning Steinfeld et al., “Livestock’s Long Shadow,” 2006, http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a0701e/a0701e00.htm.

[25] World Wildlife Fund, “Impact of Habitat Loss on Species,” accessed February 27, 2016, http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/species/problems/habitat_loss_degradation/.

[26] Center for Biological Diversity, “How Eating Meat Hurts Wildlife and the Planet,” Take Extinction Off Your Plate, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.takeextinctionoffyourplate.com/meat_and_wildlife.html.

[27] Dr Richard Oppenlander, “Freshwater Depletion: Realities of Choice,” Comfortablyunaware, accessed February 27, 2016, https://comfortablyunaware.wordpress.com/2014/11/25/freshwater-depletion-realities-of-choice/.

[28] Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability, 2013.

[29] C. Michael Hogan, “Causes of Extinction,” The Encyclopedia of Earth, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.eoearth.org/view/article/150962/.

[30] Brian Machovina, Kenneth J. Feeley, and William J. Ripple, “Biodiversity Conservation: The Key Is Reducing Meat Consumption,” \iScience of The Total Environment 536 (December 1, 2015): 419–31, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.022. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715303697

[31] Dr Richard Oppenlander, “Biodiversity and Food Choice: A Clarification,” Comfortably Unaware, accessed February 27, 2016, http://comfortablyunaware.com/blog/biodiversity-and-food-choice-a-clarification/.

[32] “Water Footprint Product Gallery,” WaterFootPrint.Org, accessed March 13, 2016, /en/resources/interactive-tools/product-gallery/.

[33] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “A Global Assessment of the Water Footprint of Farm Animal Products.”

[34] M. M. Mekonnen and A. Y. Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products,” 2010, http://doc.utwente.nl/76912.

[35] Johnny Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops,” n.d.

[36] John Robbins, Diet for a New America: How Your Food Choices Affect Your Health, Happiness and the Future of Life on Earth Second Edition, 25th Anniversary Edition edition (Tiburon, California : Novato, California: HJ Kramer/New World Library, 2012).

[37] Janet Raloff, “AAAS: Climate-Friendly Dining … Meats,” Science News, February 15, 2009, https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public/aaas-climate-friendly-dining-%E2%80%A6-meats.

[38] “Source of Half Earth’s Oxygen Gets Little Credit,” accessed March 12, 2016, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/06/0607_040607_phytoplankton.html.

[39] Dr Jack Hall, “The Most Important Organism?,” Ecology Global Network, September 12, 2011, http://www.ecology.com/2011/09/12/important-organism/.

[40] National Geographic Society and National Geographic Society, “Save the Plankton, Breathe Freely,” National Geographic Education, February 28, 2012, http://education.nationalgeographic.org/activity/save-the-plankton-breathe-freely/.

[41] Trisha B. Atwood et al., “Predators Help Protect Carbon Stocks in Blue Carbon Ecosystems,” Nature Climate Change 5, no. 12 (September 28, 2015): 1038–45, doi:10.1038/nclimate2763.

[42] Ransom A. Myers and Boris Worm, “Rapid Worldwide Depletion of Predatory Fish Communities,” Nature 423, no. 6937 (May 15, 2003): 280–83, doi:10.1038/nature01610.

[43] Atwood et al., “Predators Help Protect Carbon Stocks in Blue Carbon Ecosystems.”

[44] Sarah Sedghi, “Shark Culling May Be Contributing to Climate Change,” Text, ABC News, (September 29, 2015), http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-29/sharks-and-other-predators-help-prevent-climate-change/6813042.

[45] The “tonnes” referred to throughout this paper are metric tons. [tonne/metric ton = 1,000kg/ 2,204.6lbs; ton(UK) = 1,016kg/2,240lbs; ton(US) = 907.2kg/2,000lbs]

[46] Fen Montaigne, “The Global Fisheries Crises (Still Waters, The Global Fish Crisis),” accessed February 25, 2016, http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2007/04/global-fisheries-crisis/montaigne-text.

[47] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2012,” 2012, http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/i2727e/i2727e01.pdf.

[48] Ismeni Walter, The Last Fish: Our Exhausted Seas (English Dubbing of German Documentary “Der Letzte Fisch: Unsere Meere Am Scheideweg”), 2011, https://youtu.be/lQoVQRqQhlI with original German: https://youtu.be/_bzM_MSZNiE.

[49] Environmental Justice Foundation, “Squandering The Seas: How Shrimp Trawling Is Threatening Ecological Integrity and Food Security Around the World.,” 2003, http://ejfoundation.org/sites/default/files/public/squandering_the_seas.pdf.

[50] Walter, The Last Fish: Our Exhausted Seas (English Dubbing of German Documentary “Der Letzte Fisch: Unsere Meere Am Scheideweg”).

[51] The “tonnes” referred to throughout this paper are metric tons. [tonne/metric ton = 1,000kg/ 2,204.6lbs; ton(UK) = 1,016kg/2,240lbs; ton(US) = 907.2kg/2,000lbs]

[52] Montaigne, “The Global Fisheries Crises (Still Waters, The Global Fish Crisis).”

[53] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2012.”

[54] Walter, The Last Fish: Our Exhausted Seas (English Dubbing of German Documentary “Der Letzte Fisch: Unsere Meere Am Scheideweg”).

[55] Daniel Pauly and Dirk Zeller, “Catch Reconstructions Reveal That Global Marine Fisheries Catches Are Higher than Reported and Declining,” \iNature Communications 7 (January 19, 2016): 10244, doi:10.1038/ncomms10244. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms10244

[56] John Roach, “Seafood May Be Gone by 2048, Study Says,” National Geographic News, accessed February 25, 2016, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/061102-seafood-threat.html.

[57] Boris Worm and et al, “Impacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services,” \iScience 314, no. 5800 (November 3, 2006): 787–90, doi:10.1126. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/314/5800/787

[58] Boris Worm and et al, “Supporting Online Material: Impacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services,” accessed February 25, 2016, http://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/suppl/2006/10/31/314.5800.787.DC1/1132294.Worm.SOM.pdf.

[59] Mihai Andrei, “Oceans Are Running out of Fish – Much Faster than We Thought,” ZME Science, accessed February 25, 2016, http://www.zmescience.com/science/oceanography/fish-stocks-ocean-20012016/.

[60] Chelsea Harvey, “‘Catch Reconstructuion’ Study In Laymen’s Terms: Why We’ve Been Hugely Underestimating the Overfishing of the Oceans,” The Washington Post, January 19, 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/01/19/why-weve-been-hugely-underestimating-the-overfishing-of-the-oceans/.

[61] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2012,” 2012, http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/i2727e/i2727e01.pdf.http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/i2727e/i2727e01.pdf

[62] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “General Situation of World Fish Stocks.” http://www.fao.org/newsroom/common/ecg/1000505/en/stocks.pdf

[63] In their 2010 report, the FAO used the categories (and corresponding percentages) underexploited (3%), moderately exploited (12%), fully exploited (53%), overexploited (28%), depleted (3%), and recovering (1%) for fish stock status. This means 87% of stocks were in some form of exploitation. In their 2012 report, they combined underexploited and moderately exploited into the new category of non-fully exploited (12.7%), kept fully exploited (now at 57%), and combined overexploited, depleted, and recovering, into overexploited (29.9%). This means that 87.3% of stocks were in some form of exploitation. Finally, in 2014, they changed non-fully exploited to underfished (9.9%), fully exploited became fully fished (61.3%), and overexploited became overfished (28.8%). This means that 90.1% of stocks were in some form of exploitation as of 2011 (data used in the 2014 report). In summary, less than 10% of our fisheries remain unexploited.

[64] Yimin Ye, Kevern Cochrane, and for Fisheries and Resources Monitoring System, “Global Overview of Marine Fishery Resources,” Review of the State of World Marine Fishery Resources, 2011, 3, http://re.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/Review%20of%20the%20state%20of%20world%20marine%20fisheries.pdf#page=21.

[65] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2014,” 2014, http://www.fao.org/3/d1eaa9a1-5a71-4e42-86c0-f2111f07de16/i3720e.pdf

[66] Environmental Justice Foundation, “Squandering The Seas: How Shrimp Trawling Is Threatening Ecological Integrity and Food Security Around the World.”

[67] Walter, The Last Fish: Our Exhausted Seas (English Dubbing of German Documentary “Der Letzte Fisch: Unsere Meere Am Scheideweg”).

[68] Trisha B. Atwood et al., “Predators Help Protect Carbon Stocks in Blue Carbon Ecosystems,” Nature Climate Change 5, no. 12 (September 28, 2015): 1038–45, doi:10.1038/nclimate2763. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nclimate2763

[69] Sedghi, “Shark Culling May Be Contributing to Climate Change.”

[70] “PRESS RELEASE LOUISIANA UNIVERSITIES MARINE CONSORTIUM.”

[71] EarthTalk, “What Causes Ocean ‘Dead Zones’?”

[72] Environmental Protection Agency, “What’s the Problem? | Animal Waste | Region 9 | US EPA.”

[73] Steinfeld et al., “Livestock’s Long Shadow.”

[74] World Wildlife Fund, “Impact of Habitat Loss on Species.”

[75] Diversity, “How Eating Meat Hurts Wildlife and the Planet.”

[76] Oppenlander, “Freshwater Depletion: Realities of Choice.”

[77] Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability, 2013.

[78] Hogan, “Causes of Extinction.”

[79] Brian Machovina, Kenneth J. Feeley, and William J. Ripple, “Biodiversity Conservation: The Key Is Reducing Meat Consumption,” \iScience of The Total Environment 536 (December 1, 2015): 419–31, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.022. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715303697

[80] Oppenlander, “Biodiversity and Food Choice: A Clarification.”

[81] Harish Sethu, “The Fish We Kill to Feed the Fish We Eat,” Counting Animals, accessed February 25, 2016, http://www.CountingAnimals.com/the-fish-we-kill-to-feed-the-fish-we-eat/.

[82] “Fish Calculation Elaboration,” n.d.

[83] Carl Haub and Population Reference Bureau, “How Many People Have Ever Lived on Earth?,” accessed February 29, 2016, http://www.prb.org/Publications/Articles/2002/HowManyPeopleHaveEverLivedonEarth.aspx.

[84] Oppenlander, “Freshwater Depletion: Realities of Choice.”

[85] International Program On The State Of The Ocean, “Overview of IPSO The State of the Ocean Report 2013,” 2013, http://www.stateoftheocean.org/science/state-of-the-ocean-report/.

[86] International Program On The State Of The Ocean, “IPSO State of The Ocean Report 2013 Combined Research Papers,” 2013, http://www.stateoftheocean.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/State-of-the-Ocean-2013-report.pdf.

[87] Steinfeld et al., “Livestock’s Long Shadow.”

[88] Ibid.

[89] Philip Thorton, Mario Herrero, and Polly Ericksen, “Livestock and Climate Change,” Livestock XChange, no. no 3 (2011), https://clippings.ilri.org/2011/11/03/livestock-and-climate-change-2/.

[90] Dr Richard Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work (Minneapolis, MN: Langdon Street Press, 2013), http://amzn.to/1QLqpvq.

[91] National Academy of Sciences and Global Health and Education Foundation, “Pollution In China,” Safe Drinking Water Is Essential, accessed May 28, 2016, https://www.koshland-science-museum.org/water/html/en/Treatment/Agricultural-and-Industrial-Pollution-in-China.html.

[92] Steven E. Sexton et al., “Toward Sustainable Use of Nitrogen Fertilizers in China,” Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, 2010, https://www.motherjones.com/files/v14n2_2.pdf.

[93] United Nations Environment Programme, “Converting Waste Agricultural Biomass into a Resource: Compendium of Technologies,” 2009, http://www.unep.org/ietc/Portals/136/Publications/Waste%20Management/WasteAgriculturalBiomassEST_Compendium.pdf.

[94] United States General Accounting Office, “Animal Agriculture: Waste Management Practices – Report to the Honorable Tom Harkin, Ranking Minority Member, Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, U.S. Senate,” July 1999, http://www.gao.gov/archive/1999/rc99205.pdf.

[95] Environmental Protection Agency, “Detecting and Mitigating the Environmental Impact of Fecal Pathogens Originating from Confined Animal Feeding Operations: Review” (Environmental Protection Agency, September 14, 2010), http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPURL.cgi?Dockey=P10089B1.txt.

[96] Carrie Hribar, Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and Their Impact on Communities (National Association of Local Boards of Health. Retrieved from: www. nalboh. org, 2010), http://www.bigcovecreekalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Understanding-CAFOs-and-Their-Impact-on-Communities.pdf.

[97] United States General Accounting Office, “Animal Agriculture: Waste Management Practices – Report to the Honorable Tom Harkin, Ranking Minority Member, Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, U.S. Senate.”

[98] Environmental Protection Agency, “What’s the Problem? | Animal Waste | Region 9 | US EPA,” accessed February 27, 2016, http://www3.epa.gov/region9/animalwaste/problem.html#main.

[99] United States Department of Agriculture, “Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook,” accessed February 27, 2016, http://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/viewerFS.aspx?hid=21430.

[100] United States Department of Agriculture and National Program 206: Manure and Byproduct Utilization, “FY-2005 Annual Report Manure and Byproduct Utilization – National Program 206,” 2005, http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/programs/programs.htm?np_code=206&docid=13337.

[101] Environmental Protection Agency, “Detecting and Mitigating the Environmental Impact of Fecal Pathogens Originating from Confined Animal Feeding Operations: Review.”

[102] The Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production and The John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, “Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America,” Washington: DC, 2008, 24–25, http://www.ncifap.org/_images/PCIFAPFin.pdf.

[103] Environmental Protection Agency, “Detecting and Mitigating the Environmental Impact of Fecal Pathogens Originating from Confined Animal Feeding Operations: Review.”

[104] Smithfield Foods, “ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 – For the Twelve Months Ended : January 3, 2016,” January 3, 2016, http://apps.shareholder.com/sec/viewerContent.aspx?companyid=SFD&docid=11284393.

[105] David Pimentel et al., “Reducing Energy Inputs in the US Food System,” Human Ecology 36, no. 4 (July 15, 2008): 459–71, doi:10.1007/s10745-008-9184-3.

[106] This figure was calculated by taking Smithfield’s statistics of “processed” hogs from their “fresh pork segment” in their 2015 annual report (30.5 million in the US; 4.6 million internationally) and multiplying it by Pimentel’s figure of 2,712 pounds of waste per year per pig in the study cited above. The number accounts for total waste, not just feces, though the derivative “poo” is utilized in the video for comic effect.

[107] National Research Council (U.S.) and National Research Council (U.S.), eds., Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations: Current Knowledge, Future Needs (Washington, D.C: National Academies Press, 2003).

[108] National Pork Board and Erin Cortus, “Ambient Air Quality Regulations That Impact Swine Operations,” Pork Information Gateway, accessed May 28, 2016, http://porkgateway.org/resource/ambient-air-quality-regulations-that-impact-swine-operations/.

[109] The Humane Society of the United States, “An HSUS Report: Factory Farming in America: The True Cost of Animal Agribusiness,” n.d.

[110] Maria C. Mirabelli et al., “Asthma Symptoms Among Adolescents Who Attend Public Schools That Are Located Near Confined Swine Feeding Operations,” Pediatrics 118, no. 1 (July 1, 2006): e66–75, doi:10.1542/peds.2005-2812.

[111] Jeff Tietz, “Boss Hog: The Dark Side of America’s Top Pork Producer,” Rolling Stone, December 14, 2006, http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/boss-hog-the-dark-side-of-americas-top-pork-producer-20061214.

[112] Anu Mittal and United States Government Accountability Office, Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations: EPA Needs More Information and a Clearly Defined Strategy to Protect Air and Water Quality from Pollutants of Concern (DIANE Publishing, 2009), http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08944.pdf.

[113] Dina Fine Maron, “Defecation Nation: Pig Waste Likely to Rise in U.S. from Business Deal,” Scientific American, accessed May 26, 2016, http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/smithfield-pig-waste/.

[114] Environmental Protection Agency, “Detecting and Mitigating the Environmental Impact of Fecal Pathogens Originating from Confined Animal Feeding Operations: Review.”

[115] The Environmental Protection Agency, “Environments and Contaminants | Drinking Water Contaminants” (America’s Children and the Environment, October 2015), https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-10/documents/ace3_drinking_water.pdf.

[116] “Hog Waste Causes Environmental, Socioeconomic Disasters,” Technician, accessed May 28, 2016, http://www.technicianonline.com/news/article_334b5bdc-b4f3-11e5-b31f-af277c4f3939.html.

[117] JoAnn Burkholder et al., “Impacts of Waste from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations on Water Quality,” Environmental Health Perspectives 115, no. 2 (February 2007): 308–12, doi:10.1289/ehp.8839.

[118] The Environmental Protection Agency, “Risk Assessment Evaluation for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations” (US EPA National Risk Management Laboratory, 2004), http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyNET.exe/901V0100.TXT?ZyActionD=ZyDocument&Client=EPA&Index=2000+Thru+2005&Docs=&Query=&Time=&EndTime=&SearchMethod=1&TocRestrict=n&Toc=&TocEntry=&QField=&QFieldYear=&QFieldMonth=&QFieldDay=&IntQFieldOp=0&ExtQFieldOp=0&XmlQuery=&File=D%3A\zyfiles\Index%20Data\00thru05\Txt\00000011\901V0100.txt&User=ANONYMOUS&Password=anonymous&SortMethod=h|-&MaximumDocuments=1&FuzzyDegree=0&ImageQuality=r75g8/r75g8/x150y150g16/i425&Display=p|f&DefSeekPage=x&SearchBack=ZyActionL&Back=ZyActionS&BackDesc=Results%20page&MaximumPages=1&ZyEntry=1&SeekPage=x&ZyPURL.

[119] OW US EPA, “Table of Regulated Drinking Water Contaminants,” Overviews and Factsheets, accessed May 28, 2016, https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/table-regulated-drinking-water-contaminants.

[120] “What to Do About Pig Poop? North Carolina Fights a Rising Tide,” accessed May 26, 2016, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/10/141028-hog-farms-waste-pollution-methane-north-carolina-environment/.

[121] “Pork’s Dirty Secret: The Nation’s Top Hog Producer Is Also One of America’s Worst Polluters : Rolling Stone,” April 16, 2009, http://web.archive.org/web/20090416090221/http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/12840743/porks_dirty_secret_the_nations_top_hog_producer_is_also_one_of_americas_worst_polluters.

[122] Pimentel et al., “Reducing Energy Inputs in the US Food System.”

[123] The Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production and The John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, “Putting Meat on the Table.”

[124] US EPA, “Table of Regulated Drinking Water Contaminants.”

[125] “PRESS RELEASE LOUISIANA UNIVERSITIES MARINE CONSORTIUM,” August 4, 2014, http://www.gulfhypoxia.net/research/shelfwide%20cruises/2014/hypoxia_press_release_2014.pdf.

[126] EarthTalk, “What Causes Ocean ‘Dead Zones’?,” Scientific American, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ocean-dead-zones/.

[127] Environmental Protection Agency, “What’s the Problem? | Animal Waste | Region 9 | US EPA.”

[128] Henning Steinfeld et al., “Livestock’s Long Shadow,” 2006, http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a0701e/a0701e00.htm.

[129] World Wildlife Fund, “Impact of Habitat Loss on Species,” accessed February 27, 2016, http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/species/problems/habitat_loss_degradation/.

[130] Center for Biological Diversity, “How Eating Meat Hurts Wildlife and the Planet,” Take Extinction Off Your Plate, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.takeextinctionoffyourplate.com/meat_and_wildlife.html.

[131] Dr Richard Oppenlander, “Freshwater Depletion: Realities of Choice,” Comfortablyunaware, accessed February 27, 2016, https://comfortablyunaware.wordpress.com/2014/11/25/freshwater-depletion-realities-of-choice/.

[132] Dr Richard Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work (Minneapolis, MN: Langdon Street Press, 2013), http://amzn.to/1VJtAoO.

[133] C. Michael Hogan, “Causes of Extinction,” The Encyclopedia of Earth, accessed February 27, 2016, http://www.eoearth.org/view/article/150962/.

[134] Brian Machovina, Kenneth J. Feeley, and William J. Ripple, “Biodiversity Conservation: The Key Is Reducing Meat Consumption,” \iScience of The Total Environment 536 (December 1, 2015): 419–31, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.022. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715303697

[135] Dr Richard Oppenlander, “Biodiversity and Food Choice: A Clarification,” Comfortably Unaware, accessed February 27, 2016, http://comfortablyunaware.com/blog/biodiversity-and-food-choice-a-clarification/.

[136] Mark Devries, “Spy Drones Expose Smithfield Foods Factory Farms,” Factory Farm Drones, Spy Drones Expose Smithfield Foods Factory Farms, accessed May 26, 2016, http://factoryfarmdrones.com/.

[137] The Environmental Protection Agency and The Nutrient Recycling Challenge, “Nutrient Recycling Challenge Phase I Planning Committee and Judging Panel,” accessed May 28, 2016, https://www.challenge.gov/files/2015/10/Nutrient-Recycling-Challenge_Phase-1_Planning-Cmte-Judges-1.pdf.

[138] The Nutrient Recycling Challenge and The Environmental Protection Agency, “The Nutritent Recycling Challenge Fact Sheet,” accessed May 28, 2016, https://www.challenge.gov/files/2015/10/Nutrient-Recycling-Challenge-factsheet-May-2016-update_508.pdf.

[139] The Environmental Protection Agency and The Nutrient Recycling Challenge, “Nutrient Recycling Challenge,” Challenge.gov, accessed May 28, 2016, https://www.challenge.gov/challenge/nutrient-recycling-challenge/.

[140] Ibid.

[141] ENR, “Smithfield Foods Fined $12.6 Million, Largest Clean Water Act Fine Ever – Press Release,” accessed May 26, 2016, https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/pr/1997/August97/331enr.htm.

[142] Food & Water Watch, “The Trouble With Smithfield: A Corporate Profile,” January 2008, http://avaazimages.s3.amazonaws.com/SmithfieldJan08.pdf.

[143] Department of Justice, “#383: 06-25-03 TYSON PLEADS GUILTY TO 20 FELONIES AND AGREES TO PAY $7.5 MILLION FOR CLEAN WATER ACT VIOLATIONS,” accessed May 30, 2016, https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/pr/2003/June/03_enrd_383.htm.

[144] Jonathan Shorman, “Attorney General Sues Tyson Foods over Fish Kill,” Springfield News-Leader, June 18, 2014, http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/politics/2014/06/17/attorney-general-sues-tyson-foods-fish-kill/10681091/.

[145] “EPA Reaches Agreement With Pork Producers,” SolidWaste.com, November 27, 1998, http://www.solidwaste.com/doc/epa-reaches-agreement-with-pork-producers-0001.

[146] The Environmental Protection Agency and Partners of the Nutrient Recycling Challenge, “Competition Information, Criteria, and Guidelines,” November 2015, https://www.challenge.gov/files/2015/10/Nutrient-Recycling-Challenge-Competition-Information-Criteria-and-Guidelines.pdf.

[147] Henry Fountain, “Down on the Farm, an Endless Cycle of Animal Waste,” The New York Times, December 28, 2009, http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/29/science/29manure.html.

[148] The Humane Society of the United States, “An HSUS Report: Factory Farming in America: The True Cost of Animal Agribusiness.”

[149] Maron, “Defecation Nation.”

[150] Rebecca Neubauer, “Something Smells: Hog Farming Waste Management in North Carolina,” n.d.

[151] National Research Council (U.S.) and National Research Council (U.S.), Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations.

[152] The Environmental Protection Agency and Partners of the Nutrient Recycling Challenge, “Background Information on Nutrient Recovery Technologies and Pork and Dairy Production,” November 2015, https://www.challenge.gov/files/2015/10/Nutrient-Recycling-Challenge_Background_508_Final.pdf.

[153] Devries, “Spy Drones Expose Smithfield Foods Factory Farms.”

[154] United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “FAOSTAT,” accessed May 28, 2016, http://faostat3.fao.org/home/E.

[155] Compassion in World Farming, “Statistics: Dairy Cows – Population and Production,” January 7, 2012, https://www.ciwf.org.uk/media/5235182/Statistics-Dairy-cows.pdf.

[156] United Nations Environment Programme, “Converting Waste Agricultural Biomass into a Resource: Compendium of Technologies.”

[157] United Nations Environment Programme, “Global Partnership on Waste Management (GPWM): Waste Agricultural Biomass,” accessed May 28, 2016, http://www.unep.org/gpwm/FocalAreas/WasteAgriculturalBiomass/tabid/56456/Default.aspx.

[158] João Felippe Cury Marinho Mathias①a, “Manure as a Resource: Livestock Waste Management from Anaerobic Digestion, Opportunities and Challenges for Brazil,” International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 17, no. 4 (2014): 87.

[159] National Academy of Sciences and Global Health and Education Foundation, “Pollution In China.”

[160] “Top 10 Pork Producing Countries,” accessed May 28, 2016, http://www.mapsofworld.com/world-top-ten/pork-producing-countries.html.

[161] Sexton et al., “Toward Sustainable Use of Nitrogen Fertilizers in China.”

[162] “Origin Green Ireland: Working With Nature,” accessed August 4, 2016, http://www.origingreen.ie/.

[163] Origin Green Ireland and Irish Food Board, “Sustainability Report 2015,” accessed August 4, 2016, http://www.origingreen.ie/wp-content/themes/origingreen/sustainability_report/Origin_Green_Sustainability_Report.pdf#wpcf7-f2742-p2740-o1.

[164] “Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector NACE Rev 2” (Central Statistics Office, 2013 2008), http://www.cso.ie/px/pxeirestat/database/eirestat/Environmental%20Accounts/Environmental%20Accounts_statbank.asp.

[165] “Acid Rain Precursors by Sector NACE Rev 2” (Central Statistics Office, 2008 1999), http://www.cso.ie/px/pxeirestat/database/eirestat/Environmental%20Accounts/Environmental%20Accounts_statbank.asp.

[166] “Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector NACE Rev 2.”

[167] “Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options,” accessed March 12, 2016, http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a0701e/a0701e00.htm.

[168] Ireland and Central Statistics Office, Enviromental Indicators Ireland, 2014, 2014.

[169] Forfás, “Annual Competitiveness Report 2008, Volume One: Benchmarking Ireland’s Performance,” PDF (The National Competitiveness Council, May 11, 2011), https://web.archive.org/web/20110511175910/http://www.forfas.ie/media/ncc090108_acr_2008.pdf.

[170] Forfás, “Ireland’s Competitiveness Scorecard 2015,” July 2015, fig. 10, http://www.competitiveness.ie/Publications/2015/Ireland%20s%20Competitiveness%20Scorecard%202015.pdf.

[171] Richard Halleron, “Farming Responsible for 53% of Water Pollution Incidents,” Agriland, June 22, 2015, http://www.agriland.ie/farming-news/farming-responsible-for-53-of-water-pollution-incidents/.

[172] “Inspectors Report: APPLICATION FOR REVIEW OF AN IPPC LICENCE FROM QUEALLY PIG SLAUGHTERING LIMITED, LICENCE REGISTER PO175-02” (Environmental Protection Agency, December 2, 2011), http://www.epa.ie/licences/lic_eDMS/090151b280417f7a.pdf.

[173] “Ireland 1999-1119 TSE Audit,” July 19, 1999, http://ec.europa.eu/food/audits-analysis/audit_reports/details.cfm?rep_id=200.

[174] “Animal Welfare – Dairy Farms Audit,” Audit, Health and Food Audits and Analysis (Ireland: European Commission, July 27, 2016), http://ec.europa.eu/food/audits-analysis/audit_reports/details.cfm?rep_id=3646.

[175] Alison Healy, “New Zealand Dairy Success Comes at a Price,” The Irish Times, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/new-zealand-dairy-success-comes-at-a-price-1.2133838.

[176] Agriculture and Rural Development, “The End of Milk Quotas” (European Commission), accessed September 7, 2016, http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/milk-quota-end/index_en.htm.

[177] Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability, 2013.

[178] Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops.”

[179] “Animal Industry Report Released by Iowa State Animal Science Department | College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,” accessed March 12, 2016, https://www.cals.iastate.edu/news/releases/animal-industry-report-released-iowa-state-animal-science-department.

[180] National Soybean Research Laboratory, “Benefits of Soy,” accessed September 10, 2016, http://nsrl.illinois.edu/content/benefits-soy.

[181] “Source of Half Earth’s Oxygen Gets Little Credit.”

[182] Hall, “The Most Important Organism?”

[183] Society and Society, “Save the Plankton, Breathe Freely.”

[184] Atwood et al., “Predators Help Protect Carbon Stocks in Blue Carbon Ecosystems.”\

[185] S. E. Alter, E. Rynes, and S. R. Palumbi, “DNA Evidence for Historic Population Size and Past Ecosystem Impacts of Gray Whales,” \iProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104, no. 38 (September 18, 2007): 15162–67, doi:10.1073/pnas.0706056104. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0706056104

[186] Catherine Brahic, “Starving Whales Point to Depleted Oceans,” September 11, 2007, https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn12623-starving-whales-point-to-depleted-oceans#.VCcJr_mSwkM.

[187] Bren Smith, “The Sustainable Seafood Myth,” Grist, August 1, 2011, http://grist.org/sustainable-food/2011-08-01-the-sustainable-seafood-myth/.

[188] Jelle Bijma et al., “Climate Change and the Oceans – What Does the Future Hold?,” Marine Pollution Bulletin, The Global State of the Ocean; Interactions Between Stresses, Impacts and Some Potential Solutions. Synthesis papers from the International Programme on the State of the Ocean 2011 and 2012 Workshops, 74, no. 2 (September 30, 2013): 495–505, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.07.022.

[189] Mebrahtu Ateweberhan et al., “Climate Change Impacts on Coral Reefs: Synergies with Local Effects, Possibilities for Acclimation, and Management Implications,” \iMarine Pollution Bulletin, The Global State of the Ocean; Interactions Between Stresses, Impacts and Some Potential Solutions. Synthesis papers from the International Programme on the State of the Ocean 2011 and 2012 Workshops, 74, no. 2 (September 30, 2013): 526–39, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.06.011. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X13003020

World Health

A Diet Without Heart:

An Interactive Digital Transparency Project


VIEW ONE-MINUTE VIDEO SUBMISSION

Find citations & further resources below. You may also view this submission video on the Chasing Genius site. Please note, however, that it was not selected as a finalist so any likes or comments, while appreciated, will not count towards the challenge.



Diet is the number one cause of disability and premature death[1][2] and the majority of mortalities are preventable.[3][4] Yet by and large medical doctors are trained with years of expensive education covering every drug on the market while never addressing the true cause of disease. In fact:

  • In the United States, only one quarter of medical schools teach even a single course in nutrition.[5][6][7]
  • Heart disease, the number one killer worldwide,[8] is a dietary disease that can be and has been reversed with a vegan, plant-based diet.[26&27*][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]
  • The World Health Organization has classified certain processed meats definitively as class one carcinogens.[19]
  • The largest study on diet and cancer in human history— following a half million people for over ten years now—found that “poultry” was most associated with the risk of developing lymphoma—“up to triple the rates for every 50 grams,” the equivalent of just a quarter of a chicken breast. [26][27][29][20][21]
  • Food-borne illnesses from animal products are major public health hazards.[22]

The misinformation and disinformation surrounding nutrition [5][23] and the true impact of animal products on our health and the health of our children is a global issue. Incidences of childhood obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer are on the rise, [29] global prescription drug spending is nearing $1.5 trillion,[178] and patients regularly undergo dangerous, debilitating surgeries, all potentially prevented and reversed by education about and alteration of diet.[24][25]


The Transparency Projects will bring vital, right-to-know information to the public via an interactive map-based website, wiki, and mobile app allowing easy access to scientific studies, governmental and industry reports, advisories, and more, including—but not limited to—on the health front:

  • Scientific studies & current findings[26][27][28][29]
  • Morbidity and mortality statistics[1][3][30]
  • Health advisories & reports[31]
  • Recipes & physical activity resources [with attention to cultural, economic and additional considerations for accessibility][32][33]
  • Health code violations & community impact/resources[34][35][22][36]
  • The location and annual manure output of waste lagoons[34][35][36]
  • Farm and industry violations and illegal dumping history and status and resulting (or lack of) penalties[34][35][36][37]
  • Ground water status and safety[34][35][36][37]

In addition, an automated chat-like Q&A interface, also available as an independent mobile app, would interpret conversational questions and return relevant information and resources.



The Problem

The following are selected excerpts from some of the 350+ (and counting) videos, articles, and speech recordings on BiteSizeVegan.com. Please click on the title of each to expand its accordion. Clickable inked citations appear at the base of this page.

From “The Crime Of Raising Vegan Kids | When Diet Is Deadly”

Note: This video takes a hard look at the impact of animal products on the health of children and adolescents through the framework of a new bill in Italy proposed by Elvira Savino of the centre-right Forza Italia party, following the fourth hospitalization of a vegan child in 18 months. Savino’s bill aimed to make veganism a criminal offense and carrying a sentence of up to 6 years.

See the full video and article here.

Connecting a “vegan diet” with a criminally malnourished child is sure to sell, but what’s rarely discussed in these cases is specifically what the child was being fed and whether there were other contributing factors. When these details are provided—usually in follow-up stories quietly released long after the frenzy—the real problem is revealed.

In perfect summation, a prosecutor in an Atlanta child starvation case, stated that , “No matter how many times they want to say, ‘We’re vegans, we’re vegetarians,’ that’s not the issue in this case … The child died because he was not fed. Period.” [38]

The public is left with the message screamed in every headline, that veganism is a dangerous diet forcefully imposed upon children by their criminally irresponsible parent’s adherence to militant ideology. Once again, sensationalism sacrifices objective truth.

The reinforcement of these falsehoods reach far beyond the case in Italy. The misinformation and disinformation surrounding nutrition and the true impact of animal products on our health and the health of our children is a global issue. It results in such absurdities as Savino’s bill.

Now I’m not saying parents shouldn’t be held responsible for their child’s health—quite the opposite. Were Savino simply calling for accountability when a child’s inadequate nutrition leads to severe illness or death, I doubt there’d be much resistance.

But she states her purpose is to “stigmatize the reckless and dangerous eating behavior imposed by parents who pursue a vegan diet, to the detriment of minors.” She states that vegetarian and vegan diets are by default deficient in zinc, iron, vitamin D, B-12, and Omega-3, as well as “quality protein” and saturated fat.

The bill then calls for a punishment ranging from one year for even feeding a child a meatless diet to up to six years if such a diet results in the child’s death.

Shockingly enough, there exists something of a legal precedence for this in Italy. In April 2015, Italian courts ordered a mother to feed her son meat once a week after her former husband—who “took his son out for meals at McDonalds and prepared desserts, meat and dairy dishes on weekends”—complained that the macrobiotic diet his mother had started him on—the actual specifics of which again are not included—was putting him at risk. Oddly enough, the father was also ordered to not feed his son meat more than twice on weekends.

While this is certainly a more extreme manifestation, Savino’s bill is just another example of the perverse reversal of truth inherent in the medical and nutrition fields.

To illustrate what I mean, in 2013, Savino proposed a bill calling for an increase in support for children with blood disorders and cancers. In her current bill she’s essentially calling for force-feeding meat to children,

Study after study has shown the connection between consuming animal products and incidents of cancer, with the WHO now classifying certain processed meats definitively as class one carcinogens.[39] And while WHO only evaluated red and processed meats, the largest study on diet and cancer in human history— following a half million people for over ten years now—additionally included poultry, offal, eggs and dairy in their analysis, and found that poultry consumption was most associated with the risk of developing lymphoma (with a significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, all grades of follicular lymphoma, B-cell lymphomas in general, including B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia, including small lymphocytic leukemia and prolymphocytic lymphocytic leukemia)—“up to triple the rates for every 50 grams,” the equivalent of just a quarter of a chicken breast. [40][41]

And while people eating a plant-based diet are definitively less likely to develop all forms of cancer combined, a University of Oxford study conducted over more than 12 years showed the greatest protection provided was against blood cancers.[42][43]

So in essence, Savino is insisting children consume foods that severely increase their risk of the very cancers she’s claiming to fight, while criminalizing their most effective prevention.

It’s a perfect illustration of the perverse self-sustaining cycle upon which corporatized medicine, the animal products industry, and some governmental programs depend. Make a big show about the honorable “search for the cure.” Hold fundraisers and marches. Make ribbons and social media challenges. Pull in billions of dollars for research. And be sure to ignore the mounting and long-standing evidence that simply changing our diets would prevent the vast majority of diseases, save thousands if not millions of lives, and trillions of dollars, which may be the point after all. So doctors, nutritionists, and governmental organizations continue to recommend eating animal products, decry the dangers of veganism, then propose more programs and initiatives to combat the inevitable rise of diseases, vowing nobly to fight the epidemics of their own creation.

It’s absolute madness.

And if we’re going to play the false duality game of using isolated cases of children obviously fed unbalanced diets that happened to not contain animal products as proof that veganism as a whole is dangerous for kids, it’s only fair to apply the same logic in reverse.

How many children have been hospitalized due to diets that do contain animal products? If we really want to help the most children possible, shouldn’t we look at the main cause of illness and death?

In Italy, just like the United States, heart disease is the number one killer.[44][45][46] We’ve long had proof that a balanced vegan diet can prevent and even reverse heart disease.[47][48][49][50][51][52][53]

One in three children in Italy are overweight or obese, one of the highest rates internationally.[54][55][56][57] The largest study to date on body mass index showed the only group within the ideal weight range was vegans, with even the average vegetarian coming in overweight.[58]

Still even vegetarian children grow up thinner and even taller[59] than meat-eating kids. But at least those kids get to grow wider, gaining along with the weight “twice the risk of dying from heart attack, more cancer, gout…arthritis,” [60] diabetes and more.[61][62][63][64][65][66][67][68][69][70][71][72]

And while “vegetarian diets in general confer protection against cardiovascular disease, some cancers and death” (total mortality), vegan diets “offer additional protection for obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease mortality.”[73][74][75] Only vegans showed significanlty lower levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1, with fully plant-based diets even reversing cancer growth.[76][77][78][79][80]

Childhood diabetes alone “cuts nearly 20 years” off their life expectancy.[81] We are condemning our children to death under the guise of their care.

This woeful inadequacy of our system’s self-induced impotence was made painfully evident when an 8-year-old boy weighing 200 pounds was removed from his home when authorities determined his condition to be a form of medical neglect.[82][83] While it’s encouraging to see overnutrition recognized as but the other end of the malnourishment spectrum, such state intervention leaves authorities with the difficulty of determining exactly when a child’s weight is dangerous enough.[84] So they offer pathetically empty recommendations for yet more government programs, the absolute farcicality of which bioethics professor Arthur Caplan elucidates with depressing clarity:

“one could get ethical whiplash in a world where one arm of government is so concerned about a child’s weight that it removes him from his home, while another branch of government argues that french fries and tomato paste on pizza should be counted as servings of vegetables.”[85]

It’s fortunate that Savino is focusing on these isolated cases of supposed “vegan” malnourishment, because even if governments were to intervene in the other side of the spectrum, the sad reality is that there are simply too many overweight children to place. And after all, “who will take care of their health when neither their government nor their families seem to know how?”[86]

Savino’s insistence that iron, protein, b12, and omega three must come from animal products ignores the fact that these “foods” are a package deal. Along with animal protein comes cancer.

The vitamin D and calcium in dairy comes complete with “acne…premature puberty, multiple pregnancies…breast cancer, prostate cancer, other hormone-dependent cancers, declining sperm counts, excess estrogen, and heart disease.” [87][88][89][90][91][92][93][94][95][96][97][98][99][100][101]

To get the daily recommendation of b12 from eggs, for example, you’d be consuming an en entire year’s worth of cholesterol. [102][103]

The omega-3 in fish includes the bonus of mercury and PCBs, which adversely affect brain development, result in lower IQ scores, and increase cancer risk and mortality in cardiac patients.[104][105][106][107][108][109][110][111][112][113][114][115][116][117][118][119][120][121][122][123]

Yet when we just skip the middle animal and obtain these nutrients from their original plant sources, they come packaged with the disease-fighting and health-promoting compounds like antioxidants and fiber,[124][125][126][127][128][129][130][131] that are completely absent in animal products. b12, when not present in fortified foods, is easily and cheaply supplemented. And vitamin D supplements are advised for anyone not gaining adequate exposure to the sun.[132][133]

I could spend months attempting to unravel the insanity we’ve collectively created. I’ll link my complete nutrition video series and ongoing vegan parenting and vegan kids series.

Additionally, I’ve provided an absurd amount of additional information, citations, and resources, on the blog post for this video.

In the end, I actually hope this video has helped achieve what Savino says is her goal—to increase personal responsibility for our children’s nutrition and welfare. I also hope this video has shown that this must be an individual effort. We cannot trust what we’re told. So do the research. Take accountability. This is life and death.

From “The Best We Have To Offer”

Note: This is an excerpt from an in-depth speech I wrote for and delivered in Dublin, Ireland. While the speech largely focuses upon the impact of animal agriculture in the Republic of Ireland and the greater European Union, it provides a powerful case study for all audiences given Ireland’s status as one of the most idealized manifestations of “humane,” “sustainable” animal agriculture. Essentially, The Best We Have To Offer.

See the full video and article here.

Ireland’s SafeFood review[134] not only describes in detail how Irish chickens are hung upside down and dragged through electrified water baths, but also addresses the health impact on the human population. Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in Ireland, with “the highest burden…seen in children under five.” In 2008, of the broiler chicken carcasses inspected from Ireland, 98% were contaminated with Campylobacter.[135]

That same year, Ireland had the most outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis and E-coli in the entire EU and EEA.[136][137]

Dairy cows are prone to infections from frequent milkings, and are often pumped full of antibiotics and growth hormones, all of which seep into their milk.[138][139][140][141][142][143] Even here in Ireland there’s an official number of pus cells allowed in milk, euphemistically referred to as the “somatic cell count.” In the United States, 750,000 pus cells are allowed in every mL, with the EU specifying 400,000 cells/mL and Brazil allowing 1,000,000 cells/mL].[144][145][146][147][148][149][150][151][152][153][154]

Yes, Ireland’s dairy and beef cattle are largely pasture raised and on much smaller farms than industrial production. But even that’s changing. With the end of the milk quotas, Ireland’s largest dairy farmer said that in order to compete, “the dairy farm of the future is going to have to be bigger.”[155]

As we saw with the disease outbreaks, it’s not just the animals’ welfare that’s compromised. In Ireland, just like the United States, heart disease is the number one killer.[156][157] We’ve long had proof that a balanced vegan diet can prevent and even reverse heart disease.[158][159][160][161][162][163][164]

74% of men and 57% of women in Ireland were overweight or obese in 2010, with the World Health Organization designating Ireland as the leader of Europe’s obesity crisis, with almost the entire adult population predicted to be overweight or obese by 2030.[165]

More than 1 in 4 children in Ireland are overweight or obese,[166][167] with a SafeFood study finding 61% getting insufficient dietary fiber, 40% exceeding recommendations for dietary fat, and all exceeding salt intake by 50%, specifying that “processed meats … made a major contribution to the salt content of all children’s diets,”[168] the very kind of meat that the WHO has designated as a class one carcinogen. [169]

We’re taught that animal products are necessary for protein, vitamin D, B-12, iron, and other nutrients, but these “foods” are a package deal—inseparable from their disease-promoting components.

EPA documents show time and again the waste lagoons from pig and dairy farms and wastewater from rendering plants contaminating Ireland’s protected waters, and mislabeled or non-compliant handling of SRM materials, meaning remains at risk of containing mad-cow disease, directly threatening the public health.[170][171][172][173]

From “Why Your Doctor Is Lying To You”

Note: These excerpts are from a transcript of an interview with physician and educator Dr. Michael Greger of Nutritionfacts.org. As such, it’s conversational, not a composed written piece, thus not always translated well to written form.

 

 

See the full video and article here.
Find all interviews with Dr. Greger here including:
The Vegan Nutrition Concerns Series
The Men’s Health Series — and more!

On why the recommendations in his book How Not To Die vary greatly from the standards we hear. For example, he recommends 90 minutes of moderate intensity or 40 minutes of high intensity exercise a day versus the usual “20 minutes three times a week”:

“[It’s] the same thing. So in the “How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure” Chapter I talk about the so called “DASH diet.” The Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension. That’s the official diet, recommended by The American Heart Association. And, so what is the DASH diet? The DASH diet is kind of a low meat diet.

So, the question is why not a no-meat diet? Since meat consumption has been associated with [high blood pressure],[174] in fact not just associated – you give people meat, you give a vegetarian meat, their blood pressure goes up, you take a meat eater – you take meat away, out of their diet, within 7 days their blood pressure comes down. Not rocket science, right? Okay. So, why not a vegetarian diet?[175]

So, The American Heart Association is very clear that the only population in the western world that actually gets down to an ideal blood pressure, which is about 110 over 70, are the strict vegetarians. They’re very clear about that, they’ve been clear about that for decades. So, why do they recommend a diet that contains meat? Well, are they just unaware of this landmark research done by Harvard’s Frank Sacks back in the 70s? No, they were aware. The guy who came up with the DASH diet, the head of the design committee was Frank Sacks!

In fact they’re explicit that the number one goal of the DASH diet was to capture the blood pressure lowering benefits of a vegetarian diet, yet – they’re very explicit about this, contain enough animal products to make it palatable to the general public. So, they’re saying, “Yes, this will kill people,” but you see they’re thinking, “Maybe if we soft pedal the truth, more people will get onboard and overall, you will actually do more good in the world, right? If we actually tell people the truth – no one is going to eat a vegetarian diet, and then no one’s going to be healthy. At least now, we can help people a little bit.”

Lots of people a little bit. Okay, tell that to the thousand families a day that lose a family member to high blood pressure. Alright, maybe it’s time to start telling the American public the truth.”

On how much nutrition education medical doctors receive in the United States:[176]

“Only a quarter of medical schools have a single course [in nutrition]. So, 75% of schools don’t even have one course! So the average doctor may just get a few hours of nutrition training.

In fact, this is a study that I did an early video about years ago in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition they pitted doctors vs. patients in a simple 10 true/false question basic nutrition information, sometimes patients beat out the doctors. People out walking around the street may know more about nutrition than the doctors and we all know how much people walking around the street know about nutrition, alright.

Yet, people continue to go to their doctors for advice on healthy eating advice. And what their doctor may be telling them may be killing them! Until your doctor knows more about nutrition, their advising you about your diet is physician assisted suicide, as far as I’m concerned.”

As to why there’s still not sufficient nutrition education:

 

“There’s a number of reasons why this hasn’t penetrated yet. One – you know, the role the pharmaceutical industry plays in medical education and training. You can ask your doctor when is the last time that big broccoli took them out to lunch. It probably was not that recently. There are reimbursement problems — doctors don’t get paid to counsel their patients about diet. There’s time issues — they may not be given the time to counsel patients about diet, although how long does it take to go 21daycasestudy.org, nutritionfacts.org, buy this book. Come on, people. And there’s a tremendous kind of inertia within the medical profession.

You know, what really helped me was going back and looking at the 50s and smoking.[177] In my latest annual review, Food Is Medicine, I talk about what it was like back then. People didn’t realize — I certainly didn’t realize — the average per capita cigarette consumption was 4,000 cigarettes a year. Average person in the United States smoked a half a pack a day. Most doctors smoked.

So, it’s like today, where most people eat meat. Okay, so go back to the 1950s, and everybody smoked. The AMA said, “smoking in moderation, totally fine.” The government said to smoke, everybody said to smoke. The AMA said, on balance smoking’s probably beneficial.

So, now, the science was in already in the 1950s. There were decades of science showing that non-smokers [have a] 90% less lung cancer risk, right? So we had decades of science. The science was there, yet, all of society, everybody, doctors were telling you to smoke, the doctors were smoking themselves, right?

It wasn’t until the 1960s when the first Surgeon General’s report came out — it took 25 years, 7,000 studies they had to accumulate. You’d think after the first 6,000 they couldn’t give people a little heads-up or something? No, 7,000 studies. How many people died before the Surgeon General? What if they’d come out 10 years earlier, 20 years earlier, 25 years earlier, right?

We’re in the same situation today. The overwhelming evidence — we already have the science, right? Yet, what do we hear from our doctors, from everybody, because they’re just not aware of the science. Now eventually, society will catch up to the science, like it did in the 60s, okay. How many people have to die until that happens?

We can’t wait until society catches up to the science because it’s a matter of life or death.  We have to take the responsibility for our own health, for our family’s health, as doctors for our patients’ health, and encourage people to eat the diet that prevents and reverses our leading killer, not to mention type II diabetes, and hypertension, and everything: plant based diet.”

From “How NOT To DIE: Foods That Add Years | Dr. Michael Greger”

Note: This excerpt is from a transcript of an interview with physician and educator Dr. Michael Greger of Nutritionfacts.org. As such, it’s conversational, not a composed written piece, thus not always translated well to written form.

 

 

See the full video and article here.
Find all interviews with Dr. Greger here including:
The Vegan Nutrition Concerns Series
The Men’s Health Series — and more!

 

On whether diet and exercise are really enough to reverse, and even cure diseases or if other medical intervention is sometimes necessary:

“Even just diet alone can reverse disease. How about our number one killer, number one killer of men and women, the number one reason you and everyone you love will die: heart disease. [It] can be prevented, arrested, treated and cured with diet alone. As Dr Esselstyn has shown [and] other lifestyle medicine pioneers such as Ornish and Pritikin, used a combination of lifestyle approaches including a plant based diet plus exercise, stress reduction, all these other things.

Esselstyn, [who] just used diet, showed the same remarkable reversals, opening up arteries, in some cases, without drugs, without surgery. Now are drugs and surgery useful in some indications? Absolutely. Particularly for acute conditions. You break your leg? You want someone to set it. You have an infection? You want antibiotics to cure it. But chronic diseases, we’re talking 85% of our health-care dollars go to chronic diseases. Diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, heart disease, cancers. These are chronic diseases for which modern medicine has little to offer in terms of treating the cause of the disease, because the cause is lifestyle. It’s not medication deficiency.”

From “Deadly Nutrition: The REAL Dietary Killers | Dr. Michael Greger”

Note: This excerpt is from a transcript of an interview with physician and educator Dr. Michael Greger of Nutritionfacts.org. As such, it’s conversational, not a composed written piece, thus not always translated well to written form.

See the full video and article here.

On lack of focus on overnutrition:

“There are all sorts of ways your body makes sure you get enough of stuff. There wasn’t even nutritional science for the first couple of millions years of our existence. Our bodies had to figure it out on their own. The foundation of nutrition was based back in the first part of the twentieth century on deficiency diseases. We discovered scurvy, beriberi, pellagra.  So the whole mindset of nutrition is deficiency diseases… But when was the last time a friend of yours was diagnosed with pellagra or beriberi or scurvy these deficiency diseases? Okay, have you ever heard of anyone diagnosed with the overnutrition like heart disease or diabetes or high blood pressure?

“These are diseases of over consumption.  The overconsumption of saturated fat and cholesterol and sodium, etc.  But still the field of nutrition is in this kind of deficiency mindset making sure everybody gets enough, whereas people are dying in the millions, at least in the developed world, not by what they’re not getting enough of but what they are getting way too much of.

“There are a few nutrients that ninety seven percent of Americans don’t get enough of: Fiber.  3% of American get enough fiber.  98% of Americans don’t reach the minimum for potassium right? Where is potassium found? Greens, beans [etc] …

“You want a deficiency disease? [Fiber and potassium are] what you should be going after, but most of the diseases are caused by getting too much of the bad stuff and so that’s really where we need to think. That’s what people are going to die of, that’s what your family is going to die of.

“And of course I’m happy to just talk about and assuage fears about not getting enough of these various… you know, wacky things, but you should kind of have faith that your body has figured it out and that if we eat a variety of whole healthy plant foods we should be fine unless our diets are just packed with empty calories junk.”

 

Proposed Solution

For the Chasing Genius Challenge, applications were asked to “Describe Your Solution.” Below is a summary of how the Transparency Projects would help address the mounting global public health crisis and help us collectively move towards disease prevention, effective treatment, and reversal, as well as preventing food-borne illnesses and public health hazards. Please also refer to the statement on the primary tab for more specifics on the Projects’ logistics.

Describe Your Solution

Everyone deserves to know the impact of their choices. Everyone deserves to have the opportunity to take action that is in line with their values, and chose not to support and engage in practices that decimate our planet, endanger our health and that of our family, take food from the hungry, and harm innocent beings.

While much of the legal and governmental documentation and regulations of the animal industries is publicly available, it’s made incredibly difficult to access and effectively navigate.

The public relies on media soundbites and distilled presentations which are rarely accurate. Most people do not have the time, resources, or ability to spend months researching in the depths of documentation, studies, legislation, investigations, and more.

The Transparency Projects—much like their sister endeavor BiteSizeVegan—will bring the information to the people in an accessible, approachable, navigable manner through location-based wiki-styled interface and mobile app along with a chat-like Q&A interface, putting right-to-know information right where it should be: at your fingertips, all together making accessing years of research as easy as clicking a map marker or sending a text message.



[1] Dean Ornish, “Intensive Lifestyle Changes and Health Reform,” The Lancet Oncology 10, no. 7 (n.d.): 638–39, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(09)70175-5.

[2] Michael Greger and Gene Stone, How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease (Flatiron Books, 2015), http://amzn.to/1To9foJ.

[3] D. Ornish et al., “Effects of Stress Management Training and Dietary Changes in Treating Ischemic Heart Disease,” JAMA 249, no. 1 (January 7, 1983): 54–59.

[4] Greger and Stone, How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease.

[5] Here more on the state of nutrition education in medical schools in this interview with physician Dr. Michael Greger: Emily Moran Barwick, “Why Your Doctor Is Lying To You | Dr. Michael Greger,” Bite Size Vegan, February 8, 2016, http://bitesizevegan.com/vegan-health/why-your-doctor-is-lying-to-you-dr-michael-greger/.

[6] Kelly M. Adams, Martin Kohlmeier, and Steven H. Zeisel, “Nutrition Education in U.S. Medical Schools: Latest Update of a National Survey,” Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 85, no. 9 (September 2010): 1537–42, doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181eab71b.

[7] Greger and Stone, How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease.

[8] World Health Organization, “Global Summary Estimates of Mortality Estimates by Cause, Age and Sex, Globally and by Region, 2000–2015,” Spreadsheet, Global Health Estimates 2015: Deaths by Cause, Age, Sex, by Country and by Region, 2000-2015 (Geneva, 2016), http://www.who.int/entity/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/GHE2015_Deaths_Global_2000_2015.xls.

[9] C. B. Esselstyn et al., “A Strategy to Arrest and Reverse Coronary Artery Disease: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study of a Single Physician’s Practice,” The Journal of Family Practice 41, no. 6 (December 1995): 560–68.

[10] Caldwell B. Esselstyn et al., “A Way to Reverse CAD?,” The Journal of Family Practice 63, no. 7 (July 2014): 356–364b.

[11] Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr., “Foreword: Changing the Treatment Paradigm for Coronary Artery Disease,” American Journal of Cardiology 82, no. 10 (n.d.): 2–4, doi:10.1016/S0002-9149(98)00714-0.

[12] C. B. Esselstyn, “In Cholesterol Lowering, Moderation Kills,” Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine 67, no. 8 (August 2000): 560–64.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr. and René G. Favaloro, “Introduction: More than Coronary Artery Disease,” American Journal of Cardiology 82, no. 10 (n.d.): 5–9, doi:10.1016/S0002-9149(98)00715-2.

[15] C. B. Esselstyn, “Resolving the Coronary Artery Disease Epidemic Through Plant-Based Nutrition,” Preventive Cardiology 4, no. 4 (2001): 171–77.

[16] Caldwell Esselstyn and Mladen Golubic, “The Nutritional Reversal of Cardiovascular Disease – Fact or Fiction? Three Case Reports,” 2014, http://www.dresselstyn.com/Esselstyn_Three-case-reports_Exp-Clin-Cardiol-July-2014.pdf.

[17] C. B. Esselstyn, “Updating a 12-Year Experience with Arrest and Reversal Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease (an Overdue Requiem for Palliative Cardiology),” The American Journal of Cardiology 84, no. 3 (August 1, 1999): 339–41, A8.

[18] Greger and Stone, How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease.

[19] Véronique Bouvard et al., “Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red and Processed Meat,” The Lancet Oncology 16, no. 16 (December 1, 2015): 1599–1600, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00444-1.

[20] Sabine Rohrmann et al., “Consumption of Meat and Dairy and Lymphoma Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition,” International Journal of Cancer 128, no. 3 (February 1, 2011): 623–34, doi:10.1002/ijc.25387.

[21] Michael Greger, M.D., EPIC Findings on Lymphoma, accessed August 14, 2016, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/epic-findings-on-lymphoma/.

[22] The Republic of Ireland provides a useful case study of the public health hazards borne from animal products. Given Ireland’s idealized animal agriculture—especially compared to the United States—it’s telling that Ireland’s 2012 SafeFood Review found that 98% of the broiler chicken carcasses inspected were contaminated with Campylobacter—the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in Ireland, with “the highest burden…seen in children under five.” That same year, Ireland had the most outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis and E-coli in the entire EU and EEA. Study sources: “Consumer Focused Review of the Chicken Food Chain: 2012” (SafeFood, 2012), http://www.safefood.eu/SafeFood/media/SafeFoodLibrary/Documents/Publications/Research%20Reports/Chicken-Food-Chain-Report-Oct-2012-(3).pdf; European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Annual Epidemiological Report on Communicable Diseases in Europe 2010. (Stockholm, Sweden: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2010). For more on Ireland please see: Emily Moran Barwick, “The Best We Have To Offer? | Inside Ireland’s ‘Humane’ Farming” (Dublin, Ireland, September 28, 2016), http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-best-we-have-to-offer-inside-irelands-humane-farming/

[23] For an example of flagrant disinformation from within the animal products industry, see: Emily Moran Barwick, “The Great Egg Conspiracy: Lies, Corruption & Kevin Bacon,” Bite Size Vegan, September 9, 2015, http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-great-egg-conspiracy-lies-corruption-kevin-bacon/.

[24] Caldwell B. Esselstyn, “Is the Present Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease the Radical Mastectomy of the Twenty-First Century?,” The American Journal of Cardiology 106, no. 6 (September 2010): 902–4, doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.05.016.

[25] C. B. Esselstyn, “Presidential Address: Beyond Surgery. American Association of Endocrine Surgeons,” Surgery 110, no. 6 (December 1991): 923–27.

[26] For information on the most recent nutrition science impacting individual and public health, see the following interviews with Dr. Michael Greger: Emily Moran Barwick, “Deadly Nutrition: The REAL Dietary Killers | Dr. Michael Greger,” Bite Size Vegan, September 7, 2015, http://bitesizevegan.com/vegan-health/deadly-nutrition-the-real-dietary-killers-dr-michael-greger/; Emily Moran Barwick, “How NOT To DIE: Foods That Add Years | Dr. Michael Greger,” Bite Size Vegan, December 30, 2015, http://bitesizevegan.com/vegan-health/how-not-to-die-foods-that-add-years-dr-michael-greger/.

[27] For a powerful summary of the leading causes of death, see this end-of-the-year research summary by Dr. Michael Greger: Michael Greger, M.D., “Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death,” July 26, 2012, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/uprooting-the-leading-causes-of-death/.

[28] For an overview of the nutrients of most concern when “going vegan,” see this interview series with Dr. Michael Greger: Michael Greger, M.D., Vegan Nutrition Concerns Series, interview by Emily Moran Barwick, accessed August 18, 2017, http://bitesizevegan.com/tag/dr-greger-nutrient-series/.

[29] For the impact of animal products on the health of children and adolescents see: Emily Moran Barwick, “The Crime Of Raising Vegan Kids | When Diet Is Deadly,” BiteSizeVegan.Com, August 17, 2016, http://bitesizevegan.com/vegan-health/the-crime-of-raising-vegan-kids-when-diet-is-deadly/.

[30] For a non-US example of utilizing morbidity, mortality, and nutrition statistics and reports for applied education, see the health-related sections of this speech form Dublin, Ireland (exerpts also included below): Emily Moran Barwick, “The Best We Have To Offer? | Inside Ireland’s ‘Humane’ Farming” (Dublin, Ireland, September 28, 2016), http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-best-we-have-to-offer-inside-irelands-humane-farming/.

[31] For examples of accessible summations of studies, reports and advisories, see the year-end talks by Dr. Michael Greger: Greger, M.D., “Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death”; Michael Greger, M.D., “More Than an Apple a Day: Combating Common Diseases,” July 15, 2013, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/more-than-an-apple-a-day-preventing-our-most-common-diseases/; Michael Greger, M.D., “From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food,” August 1, 2014, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/from-table-to-able/; Michael Greger, M.D., “Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Dreaded Diseases with Diet | NutritionFacts.Org,” August 3, 2015, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/food-as-medicine/; If you’re short on time, see this “best of” from the preceeding reports: Michael Greger, M.D., “HOW NOT TO DIE: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers,” August 5, 2016, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die/.

[32] For examples of increasing the accessibility of health-promoting whole foods, see these posts: Emily Moran Barwick, “Increasing Accessibility Posts,” Bite Size Vegan, accessed August 18, 2017, http://bitesizevegan.com/tag/accessibility/.

[33] Hear from vegan athletes from various fields and background in this interview series: Emily Moran Barwick, “Vegan Athlete Series,” accessed August 18, 2017, http://bitesizevegan.com/tag/vegan-athlete-series/.

[34] For a brief overview of the public health impact of waste lagoons, see this satirical—but cited!—video (excerpts below as well): Emily Moran Barwick, “$30K Poop Nutrition Challenge! | Sponsored By Ben & Jerry’s,” Bite Size Vegan, May 30, 2016, http://bitesizevegan.com/environmental-societal-impact/30k-poop-nutrition-challenge-sponsored-by-ben-jerrys/.

[35] This cross-posted meme demonstrates an example of social-media outreach with the information that will be housed and available through the Transparency Projects: Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Facebook Post Example,” Bite Size Vegan Facebook Page, June 13, 2017, https://www.facebook.com/BiteSizeVegan/photos/a.326987104090591.1073741829.325985774190724/1213415542114405/?type=3; Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Instagram Post Example,” Bite Size Vegan Instagram, June 13, 2017, https://www.instagram.com/p/BVSyot5hmJy/; Emily Moran Barwick, “Waste Related Meme Twitter Post Example,” Tweet, BiteSizeVegan Twitter, (June 2, 2017), https://twitter.com/BiteSizeVegan/status/874735929512017921; As specified in the posts, the statistics mentioned in these posts (excepting Twitter due to character limits) were from the Follow The Manure Report: Less=More Coalition and Sierra Club Michigan Chapter and SociallyResponsible Agricultural Project, “Follow the Manure [Report Documentation],” Sierra Club, November 17, 2015, http://www.sierraclub.org/michigan/follow-manure-factory-farms-and-lake-erie-algal-crisis.

[36] For a thorough, in-depth case study of the actual impact of health, humane, and environmental regulations, and monitoring and enforcement, please see: Barwick, “The Best We Have To Offer? | Inside Ireland’s ‘Humane’ Farming.”

[37] For an impressive example of public health and environment-relevant information assimilation and presentation on the local scale, see the following report and maps by the Less=More Coalition of the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter, which I referenced in my as-of-yet unpublished speech “You Have Been Lie To”: Less=More Coalition and Sierra Club Michigan Chapter and SociallyResponsible Agricultural Project, “Follow the Manure.”

[38] The Associated Press, “Vegans Will Serve Life for Baby’s Death,” NY Daily News, September 12, 2011, http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/vegan-couple-serve-life-sentences-starving-baby-death-court-rules-article-1.957707.

[39] Bouvard et al., “Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red and Processed Meat.”

[40] Rohrmann et al., “Consumption of Meat and Dairy and Lymphoma Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.”

[41] Greger, M.D., EPIC Findings on Lymphoma.

[42] T. J. Key et al., “Cancer Incidence in British Vegetarians,” British Journal of Cancer 101, no. 1 (July 7, 2009): 192–97, doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605098.

[43] Greger and Stone, How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease, 156.

[44] Istat, “HEALTH: Smoking, Alcohol, Obesity: Risk Factors,” Noi Italia, 2015, http://noi-italia2015.istat.it/index.php?id=7&L=1&user_100ind_pi1%5Bid_pagina%5D=141&cHash=12ea5a0773dea6165df187d4e91ad341.

[45] Istat, “Leading Causes of Death in Italy” (Istat, December 3, 2014), http://www.istat.it/en/archive/140877.

[46] OECD, Health at a Glance 2015 (Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2015), http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/content/book/health_glance-2015-en.

[47] Esselstyn et al., “A Strategy to Arrest and Reverse Coronary Artery Disease.”

[48] Esselstyn et al., “A Way to Reverse CAD?”

[49] Esselstyn, “Foreword: Changing the Treatment Paradigm for Coronary Artery Disease.”

[50] Esselstyn, “In Cholesterol Lowering, Moderation Kills.”

[51] Esselstyn, “Resolving the Coronary Artery Disease Epidemic Through Plant-Based Nutrition.”

[52] Esselstyn and Golubic, “The Nutritional Reversal of Cardiovascular Disease – Fact or Fiction? Three Case Reports.”

[53] Esselstyn, “Updating a 12-Year Experience with Arrest and Reversal Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease (an Overdue Requiem for Palliative Cardiology).”

[54] The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, “Obesity and the Economics of Prevention: Fit Not Fat – Italy Key Facts,” accessed August 13, 2016, http://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems/obesityandtheeconomicsofpreventionfitnotfat-italykeyfacts.htm.

[55] OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, “Obesity Update” (The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, June 2014), http://www.oecd.org/health/Obesity-Update-2014.pdf.

[56] OECD, Health at a Glance 2015.

[57] F. Celi et al., “Epidemiology of Overweight and Obesity among School Children and Adolescents in Three Provinces of Central Italy, 1993-2001: Study of Potential Influencing Variables,” European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 57, no. 9 (September 2003): 1045–51, doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601640.

[58] Serena Tonstad et al., “Type of Vegetarian Diet, Body Weight, and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes,” Diabetes Care 32, no. 5 (May 2009): 791–96, doi:10.2337/dc08-1886.

[59] J. Sabaté et al., “Attained Height of Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Children and Adolescents,” European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, no. 1 (January 1991): 51–58.

[60] Michael Greger, M.D., How to Prevent Prediabetes in Children, 2014, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-prevent-prediabetes-in-children/.

[61] Joan Sabaté and Michelle Wien, “Vegetarian Diets and Childhood Obesity Prevention,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 91, no. 5 (May 2010): 1525S–1529S, doi:10.3945/ajcn.2010.28701F.

[62] Thomas Reinehr, “Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescents,” World Journal of Diabetes 4, no. 6 (December 15, 2013): 270–81, doi:10.4239/wjd.v4.i6.270.

[63] American Heart Association, “Overweight in Children,” July 5, 2016, http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyKids/ChildhoodObesity/Overweight-in-Children_UCM_304054_Article.jsp#.V68hSY50fKB.

[64] P. K. Newby, “Plant Foods and Plant-Based Diets: Protective against Childhood Obesity?,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 89, no. 5 (May 2009): 1572S–1587S, doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.26736G.

[65] Adam G. Tabák et al., “Prediabetes: A High-Risk State for Diabetes Development,” Lancet (London, England) 379, no. 9833 (June 16, 2012): 2279–90, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60283-9.

[66] Kaivan Khavandi et al., “Strategies for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: An Update for Clinicians,” Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease 4, no. 5 (September 2013): 242–61, doi:10.1177/2040622313494986.

[67] Richard E. Pratley, “The Early Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes,” The American Journal of Medicine 126, no. 9 Suppl 1 (September 2013): S2-9, doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2013.06.007.

[68] Anna Mg Cali and Sonia Caprio, “Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: An Emerging Epidemic Disease?,” Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Obesity 15, no. 2 (April 2008): 123–27, doi:10.1097/MED.0b013e3282f57251.

[69] Robert Jasmer, M.D., “Heart Health Not Ideal in Most Children,” August 12, 2016, http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Prevention/59659.

[70] A. Must et al., “Long-Term Morbidity and Mortality of Overweight Adolescents. A Follow-up of the Harvard Growth Study of 1922 to 1935,” The New England Journal of Medicine 327, no. 19 (November 5, 1992): 1350–55, doi:10.1056/NEJM199211053271904.

[71] Roel J. J. van de Laar et al., “Lower Lifetime Dietary Fiber Intake Is Associated with Carotid Artery Stiffness: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 96, no. 1 (July 2012): 14–23, doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.024703.

[72] Hongyan Ning et al., “Status of Cardiovascular Health in US Children Up to 11 Years of Age The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2003–2010,” Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes 8, no. 2 (March 1, 2015): 164–71, doi:10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.114.001274.

[73] Lap Tai Le and Joan Sabaté, “Beyond Meatless, the Health Effects of Vegan Diets: Findings from the Adventist Cohorts,” Nutrients 6, no. 6 (June 2014): 2131–47, doi:10.3390/nu6062131.

[74] Yoko Yokoyama et al., “Vegetarian Diets and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis,” JAMA Internal Medicine 174, no. 4 (April 2014): 577–87, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.14547.

[75] Greger, M.D., “Food as Medicine.”

[76] Naomi E. Allen et al., “The Associations of Diet with Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I and Its Main Binding Proteins in 292 Women Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians, and Vegans,” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 11, no. 11 (November 1, 2002): 1441–48.

[77] N E Allen et al., “Hormones and Diet: Low Insulin-like Growth Factor-I but Normal Bioavailable Androgens in Vegan Men,” British Journal of Cancer 83, no. 1 (July 2000): 95–97, doi:10.1054/bjoc.2000.1152.

[78] Michael Greger, M.D., “Animal Protein and the Cancer Promoter IGF-1,” NutritionFacts.Org, February 14, 2013, http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/02/14/animal-protein-and-igf-1/.

[79] Dean Ornish et al., “Intensive Lifestyle Changes May Affect the Progression of Prostate Cancer,” The Journal of Urology 174, no. 3 (September 2005): 1065-1069; discussion 1069-1070, doi:10.1097/01.ju.0000169487.49018.73.

[80] Tung H. Ngo et al., “Effect of Diet and Exercise on Serum Insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 Levels and Growth of LNCaP Cells in Vitro (United States),” Cancer Causes & Control: CCC 13, no. 10 (December 2002): 929–35.

[81] Cali and Caprio, “Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Youth.”

[82] Mary Elizabeth Williams, “Is Childhood Obesity Abusive? – Salon.Com,” accessed August 13, 2016, http://www.salon.com/2011/11/29/is_childhood_obesity_abusive/.

[83] Rachel Dissell Dealer The Plain, “County Places Obese Cleveland Heights Child in Foster Care,” Cleveland.Com, November 27, 2011, http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2011/11/obese_cleveland_heights_child.html.

[84] Murtagh L and Ludwig DS, “State Intervention in Life-Threatening Childhood Obesity,” JAMA 306, no. 2 (July 13, 2011): 206–7, doi:10.1001/jama.2011.903.

[85] Dealer, “County Places Obese Cleveland Heights Child in Foster Care.”

[86] Williams, “Is Childhood Obesity Abusive? – Salon.Com.”

[87] Michael Greger, M.D., “Dairy,” August 8, 2016, http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/.

[88] F. William Bill Danby, “Acne, Dairy and Cancer: The 5alpha-P Link,” Dermato-Endocrinology 1, no. 1 (January 2009): 12–16.

[89] Myriam C. Afeiche et al., “Dairy Intake and Semen Quality among Men Attending a Fertility Clinic,” Fertility and Sterility 101, no. 5 (May 2014): 1280–87, doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.02.003.

[90] P. Regal, A. Cepeda, and C. Fente, “Development of an LC-MS/MS Method to Quantify Sex Hormones in Bovine Milk and Influence of Pregnancy in Their Levels,” Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment 29, no. 5 (2012): 770–79, doi:10.1080/19440049.2011.653989.

[91] Bodo C. Melnik, “Evidence for Acne-Promoting Effects of Milk and Other Insulinotropic Dairy Products,” Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series. Paediatric Programme 67 (2011): 131–45, doi:10.1159/000325580.

[92] Kazumi Maruyama, Tomoe Oshima, and Kenji Ohyama, “Exposure to Exogenous Estrogen through Intake of Commercial Milk Produced from Pregnant Cows,” Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society 52, no. 1 (February 2010): 33–38, doi:10.1111/j.1442-200X.2009.02890.x.

[93] Tina K. Jensen et al., “High Dietary Intake of Saturated Fat Is Associated with Reduced Semen Quality among 701 Young Danish Men from the General Population,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 97, no. 2 (February 2013): 411–18, doi:10.3945/ajcn.112.042432.

[94] D. Ganmaa et al., “Is Milk Responsible for Male Reproductive Disorders?,” Medical Hypotheses 57, no. 4 (October 2001): 510–14, doi:10.1054/mehy.2001.1380.

[95] Myriam C. Afeiche et al., “Meat Intake and Reproductive Parameters among Young Men,” Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 25, no. 3 (May 2014): 323–30, doi:10.1097/EDE.0000000000000092.

[96] Brook E. Harmon et al., “Oestrogen Levels in Serum and Urine of Premenopausal Women Eating Low and High Amounts of Meat,” Public Health Nutrition 17, no. 9 (September 2014): 2087–93, doi:10.1017/S1368980013002553.

[97] A. Daxenberger, D. Ibarreta, and H. H. Meyer, “Possible Health Impact of Animal Oestrogens in Food,” Human Reproduction Update 7, no. 3 (June 2001): 340–55.

[98] Roya Rozati et al., “Role of Environmental Estrogens in the Deterioration of Male Factor Fertility,” Fertility and Sterility 78, no. 6 (December 2002): 1187–94.

[99] R. B. Arora et al., “Sperm Studies on Indian Men,” Fertility and Sterility 12 (August 1961): 365–67.

[100] Lise Aksglaede et al., “The Sensitivity of the Child to Sex Steroids: Possible Impact of Exogenous Estrogens,” Human Reproduction Update 12, no. 4 (August 2006): 341–49, doi:10.1093/humupd/dml018.

[101] Gary Steinman, MD, PhD, “BOVINE HORMONES AND SPONTANEOUS TWINNING IN HUMANS” (Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Long Island Jewish Medical Cente, October 2006), http://milksymposium.mcgill.ca/pdf/2_3-steinman.pdf.

[102] A. S. Levine and A. Doscherholmen, “Vitamin B12 Bioavailability from Egg Yolk and Egg White: Relationship to Binding Proteins,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 38, no. 3 (September 1983): 436–39.

[103] Michael Greger, M.D., Safest Source of B12, 2012, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/safest-source-of-b12/.

[104] B. H. Choi et al., “Abnormal Neuronal Migration, Deranged Cerebral Cortical Organization, and Diffuse White Matter Astrocytosis of Human Fetal Brain: A Major Effect of Methylmercury Poisoning in Utero,” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology 37, no. 6 (December 1978): 719–33.

[105] L. W. Lapham et al., “An Analysis of Autopsy Brain Tissue from Infants Prenatally Exposed to Methymercury,” Neurotoxicology 16, no. 4 (1995): 689–704.

[106] Roxanne Karimi, Timothy P. Fitzgerald, and Nicholas S. Fisher, “A Quantitative Synthesis of Mercury in Commercial Seafood and Implications for Exposure in the United States,” Environmental Health Perspectives 120, no. 11 (November 2012): 1512–19, doi:10.1289/ehp.1205122.

[107] J. J. Strain et al., “Associations of Maternal Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Methyl Mercury, and Infant Development in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study,” Neurotoxicology 29, no. 5 (September 2008): 776–82, doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2008.06.002.

[108] Daniel A. Axelrad et al., “Dose-Response Relationship of Prenatal Mercury Exposure and IQ: An Integrative Analysis of Epidemiologic Data,” Environmental Health Perspectives 115, no. 4 (April 2007): 609–15, doi:10.1289/ehp.9303.

[109] Margaret R. Karagas et al., “Evidence on the Human Health Effects of Low-Level Methylmercury Exposure,” Environmental Health Perspectives 120, no. 6 (June 2012): 799–806, doi:10.1289/ehp.1104494.

[110] Marco J. Zeilmaker et al., “Fish Consumption during Child Bearing Age: A Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis on Neurodevelopment,” Food and Chemical Toxicology: An International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 54 (April 2013): 30–34, doi:10.1016/j.fct.2011.10.068.

[111] Michael Greger, M.D., Fish Intake Associated With Brain Shrinkage, 2013, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/fish-consumption-associated-with-brain-shrinkage/.

[112] Michael Greger, M.D., “How Seafood Can Impact Brain Development,” NutritionFacts.Org, November 4, 2014, http://nutritionfacts.org/2014/11/04/how-seafood-can-impact-brain-development/.

[113] Philippe Grandjean et al., “Marine Food Pollutants as a Risk Factor for Hypoinsulinemia and Type 2 Diabetes,” Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 22, no. 3 (May 2011): 410–17, doi:10.1097/EDE.0b013e318212fab9.

[114] T. Inasmasu et al., “Mercury Concentration Change in Human Hair after the Ingestion of Canned Tuna Fish,” Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 37, no. 4 (October 1986): 475–81.

[115] Michael Greger, M.D., Mercury vs. Omega-3s for Brain Development, 2013, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/mercury-vs-omega-3s-for-brain-development/.

[116] D. McALPINE and S. Araki, “Minamata Disease: An Unusual Neurological Disorder Caused by Contaminated Fish,” Lancet (London, England) 2, no. 7047 (September 20, 1958): 629–31.

[117] Harmon et al., “Oestrogen Levels in Serum and Urine of Premenopausal Women Eating Low and High Amounts of Meat.”

[118] Miquel Porta, “Persistent Organic Pollutants and the Burden of Diabetes,” Lancet (London, England) 368, no. 9535 (August 12, 2006): 558–59, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69174-5.

[119] Jacqueline F. Gould et al., “Randomized Controlled Trial of Maternal Omega-3 Long-Chain PUFA Supplementation during Pregnancy and Early Childhood Development of Attention, Working Memory, and Inhibitory Control,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 99, no. 4 (April 2014): 851–59, doi:10.3945/ajcn.113.069203.

[120] I. Bilic Cace et al., “Relationship between the Prenatal Exposure to Low-Level of Mercury and the Size of a Newborn’s Cerebellum,” Medical Hypotheses 76, no. 4 (April 2011): 514–16, doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2010.12.005.

[121] Michael Greger, M.D., Should Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women Take DHA?, 2016, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/pregnant-breastfeeding-women-take-dha/.

[122] Michael Greger, M.D., Hair Testing for Mercury Before Considering Pregnancy, 2012, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/hair-testing-for-mercury-before-considering-pregnancy/.

[123] Michael Greger, M.D., How Long to Detox From Fish Before Pregnancy?, 2013, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-long-to-detox-from-fish-before-pregnancy/.

[124] Monica H Carlsen et al., “The Total Antioxidant Content of More than 3100 Foods, Beverages, Spices, Herbs and Supplements Used Worldwide,” Nutrition Journal 9 (January 22, 2010): 3, doi:10.1186/1475-2891-9-3.

[125] David B. Haytowitz and Seema Bhagwat, “USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods, Release 2” (Nutrient Data Laboratory Beltsville Human Nutrition Re search Center (BHNRC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), May 2010), http://www.orac-info-portal.de/download/ORAC_R2.pdf.

[126] H. Kahleova et al., “Vegetarian Diet Improves Insulin Resistance and Oxidative Stress Markers More than Conventional Diet in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes,” Diabetic Medicine: A Journal of the British Diabetic Association 28, no. 5 (May 2011): 549–59, doi:10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03209.x.

[127] Ibid.

[128] S. Addanki, “Roles of Nutrition, Obesity, and Estrogens in Diabetes Mellitus: Human Leads to an Experimental Approach to Prevention,” Preventive Medicine 10, no. 5 (September 1981): 577–89.

[129] D. S. Ludwig et al., “Dietary Fiber, Weight Gain, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Young Adults,” JAMA 282, no. 16 (October 27, 1999): 1539–46.

[130] Michael Greger, M.D., How May Plants Protect Against Diabetes?, 2015, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-may-plants-protect-against-diabetes/.

[131] Michael Greger, M.D., Antioxidant Content of 3,139 Foods, 2011, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/antioxidant-content-of-3139-foods/.

[132] Michael Greger, M.D., Vitamin Supplements Worth Taking, 2011, http://nutritionfacts.org/video/vitamin-supplements-worth-taking/.

[133] Greger, M.D., Safest Source of B12.

[134] “Consumer Focused Review of the Chicken Food Chain: 2012” (SafeFood, 2012), http://www.safefood.eu/SafeFood/media/SafeFoodLibrary/Documents/Publications/Research%20Reports/Chicken-Food-Chain-Report-Oct-2012-(3).pdf.

[135] Ibid.

[136] European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Annual Epidemiological Report on Communicable Diseases in Europe 2010.

[137] Lorenza Putignani and Donato Menichella, “Global Distribution, Public Health and Clinical Impact of the Protozoan Pathogen Cryptosporidium,” Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases 2010 (July 14, 2010): e753512, doi:10.1155/2010/753512.

[138] P. L. Ruegg and T. J. Tabone, “The Relationship Between Antibiotic Residue Violations and Somatic Cell Counts in Wisconsin Dairy Herds,” Journal of Dairy Science 83, no. 12 (December 1, 2000): 2805–9, doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(00)75178-2.

[139] Dan Charles Twitter, “FDA Tests Turn Up Dairy Farmers Breaking The Law On Antibiotics,” NPR.Org, accessed April 22, 2016, http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/03/08/391248045/fda-tests-turn-up-dairy-farmers-breaking-the-law-on-antibiotics.

[140] Department of Health and Human Services and Center for Veterinary Medicine, “MILK DRUG RESIDUE SAMPLING SURVEY” (Food and Drug Administration, March 2015), http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/GuidanceComplianceEnforcement/ComplianceEnforcement/UCM435759.pdf.

[141] “Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone,” American Cancer Society, September 10, 2014, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/recombinant-bovine-growth-hormone.

[142] Pamela L. Ruegg, “Relationship between Bulk Tank Milk Somatic Cell Count and Antibiotic Residues,” in Proceeding of the 2005 National Mastitis Council Meeting. National Mastitis Council, 2005, 28, http://www.nmconline.org/articles/residues.pdf.

[143] G. van Schaik, M. Lotem, and Y. H. Schukken, “Trends in Somatic Cell Counts, Bacterial Counts, and Antibiotic Residue Violations in New York State during 1999-2000,” Journal of Dairy Science 85, no. 4 (April 2002): 782–89, doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(02)74136-2.

[144] Veterinary Services Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Healthogy and Animal Health, “Determining U.S. Milk Quality Using Bulk-Tank Somatic Cell Counts” (USDA – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, September 2012).

[145] Public Health Service and Food and Drug Admin, “Grade ‘A’ Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. 2011 Revision” (U.S. Department of He alth and Human Services, 2011), http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodSafety/Product-SpecificInformation/MilkSafety/NationalConferenceonInterstateMilkShipmentsNCIMSModelDocuments/UCM291757.pdf.

[146] “Hoards Dairyman: Somatic Cell Legal Limit Will Stay the Same,” Hoard’s Dairyman, May 5, 2011, http://www.hoards.com/blog_somaticcelllegallimitdairy801.

[147] Jack McAllister and Mark Witherspoon, Measuring Somatic Cell Counts in DHIA, 2013, http://afsdairy.ca.uky.edu/files/extension/mastitis/Measuring_Somatic_Cell_Counts.pdf.

[148] Milk Facts, “Mastitis and Somatic Cells,” MilkFacts.Info, accessed April 22, 2016, http://www.milkfacts.info/Milk%20Microbiology/Mastitis%20and%20SCC.htm.

[149] Jerome Wilfred Schroeder, Bovine Mastitis and Milking Management (NDSU Extension Service, 1997), https://library.ndsu.edu/repository/bitstream/handle/10365/5362/as1129.pdf?sequence=1.

[150] G. M. Jones and T. L. Bailey, “Understanding the Basics of Mastitis | Publications and Educational Resources,” Publications and Educational Resources, Virgiania Tech | Virginia Cooperative Extension, (May 1, 2009), https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/404/404-233/404-233.html.

[151] National Mastitis Council, Current Concepts of Bovine Mastitis, 4th ed. (Arlington, VA: National Mastitis Council, 1996), https://books.google.de/books/about/Current_concepts_of_bovine_mastitis.html?id=–hUAAAAYAAJ&redir_esc=y.

[152] J. Eric Hillerton and Elizabeth A. Berry, “Quality of the Milk Supply: European Regulations versus Practice,” in NMC Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2004, 207–214, https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Hillerton/publication/268260157_QUALITY_OF_THE_MILK_SUPPLY_EUROPEAN_REGULATIONS_VERSUS_PRACTICE/links/54bd5f7f0cf218da9391b01e.pdf.

[153] Larry K. Smith and J. S. Hogan, “Milk Quality – A Worldwide Perspective,” vol. 1998 Annual Meeting Proceedings (National Mastitis Council Annual Meeting, St. Louis, Missouri: National Mastitis Council, 1998), http://www.nmconline.org/articles/keynote98.htm.

[154] Graciela E. Gutman Elizabeth M. M.Q. Farina, “‘Private and Public Milk Standards in Argentina and Brazil,’” Food Policy 30, no. 3 (2005), doi:10.1016/j.foodpol.2005.05.008.

[155] Sarah McCabe, “Ireland’s Biggest Dairy Farmer Warns against Quota Euphoria,” Independent.Ie, May 4, 2015, http://www.independent.ie/business/irish/irelands-biggest-dairy-farmer-warns-against-quota-euphoria-31118285.html.

[156] Department of Health, “Causes of Death |,” accessed August 27, 2016, http://health.gov.ie/publications-research/statistics/statistics-by-topic/causes-of-death/.

[157] OECD, Health at a Glance 2015.

[158] Esselstyn et al., “A Strategy to Arrest and Reverse Coronary Artery Disease.”

[159] Esselstyn et al., “A Way to Reverse CAD?”

[160] Esselstyn, “Foreword: Changing the Treatment Paradigm for Coronary Artery Disease.”

[161] Esselstyn, “In Cholesterol Lowering, Moderation Kills.”

[162] Esselstyn, “Resolving the Coronary Artery Disease Epidemic Through Plant-Based Nutrition.”

[163] Esselstyn and Golubic, “The Nutritional Reversal of Cardiovascular Disease – Fact or Fiction? Three Case Reports.”

[164] Esselstyn, “Updating a 12-Year Experience with Arrest and Reversal Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease (an Overdue Requiem for Palliative Cardiology).”

[165] Dr. Joao Breda, “Proportion of Overweight and Obese Males and Females to Increase in Most European Countries by 2030, Say Latest Projections by WHO” (World Health Organization, May 6, 2015), http://nhfshare.heartforum.org.uk/RMAssets/NHFMediaReleases/2015/ECO2015WEDSPRESSWHO4.pdf.

[166] “Your Child’s Weight: A Guide to Preventing Childhood Obesity” (SafeFood, October 2013), http://www.safefood.eu/SafeFood/media/SafeFoodLibrary/Documents/Publications_1/Childhood-Obesity-Campaign-ROI.pdf.

[167] “Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity: Ireland” (World Health Organization), accessed September 9, 2016, http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/243304/Ireland-WHO-Country-Profile.pdf.

[168] The National Children’s Food Survey, safefood, and Health Service Executive, “Body Weight and Eating Habits in 5-12 Year Old Irish Children,” PDF (SafeFood, May 2011), http://www.safefood.eu/SafeFood/media/SafeFoodLibrary/Documents/Publications/Research%20Reports/Bodyweight-pdf.pdf.

[169] Bouvard et al., “Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red and Processed Meat.”

[170] Richard Halleron, “Farming Responsible for 53% of Water Pollution Incidents,” Agriland, June 22, 2015, http://www.agriland.ie/farming-news/farming-responsible-for-53-of-water-pollution-incidents/.

[171] “Inspectors Report: APPLICATION FOR REVIEW OF AN IPPC LICENCE FROM QUEALLY PIG SLAUGHTERING LIMITED, LICENCE REGISTER PO175-02” (Environmental Protection Agency, December 2, 2011), http://www.epa.ie/licences/lic_eDMS/090151b280417f7a.pdf.

[172] “Ireland 1999-1119 TSE Audit,” July 19, 1999, http://ec.europa.eu/food/audits-analysis/audit_reports/details.cfm?rep_id=200.

[173] “Animal Welfare – Dairy Farms Audit,” Audit, Health and Food Audits and Analysis (Ireland: European Commission, July 27, 2016), http://ec.europa.eu/food/audits-analysis/audit_reports/details.cfm?rep_id=3646.

[174] Barwick, “Deadly Nutrition.”

[175] Emily Moran Barwick, “Vegan vs. Vegetarian,” Bite Size Vegan, October 20, 2014, http://bitesizevegan.com/vegan-lifestyle-2/vegan-vs-vegetarian/.

[176] Barwick, “Why Your Doctor Is Lying To You | Dr. Michael Greger.”

[177] Emily Moran Barwick, “Is Smoking Vegan?,” Bite Size Vegan, October 7, 2015, http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/is-smoking-vegan/.

[178] “Outlook for Global Medicines through 2021: Balancing Cost And Value” (Quintiles IMS Institute, December 2016), http://www.imshealth.com/en/thought-leadership/quintilesims-institute/reports; Report PDF: http://bitesizevegan.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/QIIHI_Outlook_for_Global_Medicines_through_2021.pdf

Feeding 9 Billion

A Grain Of Truth:

An Interactive Digital Transparency Project




Animal agriculture diverts an astounding amount of food, water, and resources to the animals we eat—statistical realities which are difficult for the public to access and rarely presented clearly.

  • Globally, we feed close to 40% of our grain to our food animals.[1]
  • The United States alone could feed 800 million people with the grain we feed to our livestock—more than the estimated 795 million people going hungry in the world today.[2][3]
  • The amount of land that it takes to produce 37,000 pounds of plant-based foods will only yield 375 pounds of meat.[4][5][6]
  • The land required to feed 1 vegan for 1 year is 1/6th acre. It takes 3 times as much for a vegetarian, meaning someone who consumes dairy and eggs but no meat, and 18 times as much for a meat-eater.[7][8]
  • You can grow 15 times more protein on any given area of land with plants versus animals.
  • 98% of the massive water footprint for animal agriculture goes to growing feed crops for the animals we eat.[9]
  • Roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year — approximately 1.3 billion tonnes — gets lost or wasted.[10][11]
  • It is more efficient to obtain calories, protein and fat through crop products than animal products.” [12][13][14]

A global shift to veganism will not automatically result in the proper redistribution of our crops to those in need, nor address the issue of unnecessary food wastage, but it’s the only way we can have enough food to feed everyone.


The Transparency Projects will consist of an interactive map-based website, wiki, and mobile app allowing easy access to vital information including (but not limited to) on the world-hunger front:

  • Food wastage statistics and individual, community, industry and governmental actions for reduction.[10][11]
  • Amount of food and resources diverted to “livestock” (farmed animals) per farm/area[15]
  • Information on national and local programs connecting gardeners to food pantries and nonprofits working locally to internationally to feed the hungry with sustainable, farmer-empowering, health-promoting plant based foods[16]
  • Local community garden programs and locations[16]

In addition, an automated chat-like Q&A interface, also available as an independent mobile app, would interpret conversational questions and return relevant information and resources.



The Problem

The following are selected excerpts from some of the 350+ (and counting) videos, articles, and speech recordings on BiteSizeVegan.com. Please click on the title of each to expand its accordion. Clickable inked citations appear at the base of this page.

From “The Extremism of Veganism | Exposing The Greatest Lie”

See the full video and article here.

Without fail, the food products with the smallest water footprints by weight are plant-based.[17][18][19]

Of course weight doesn’t necessarily mean sustenance. Still, global averages show that “when viewed from a caloric standpoint, the water footprint of animal products is larger than for crop products” with “the average water footprint per calorie for beef [being] twenty times larger than for cereals and starchy roots.”[20]

And with protein being one of the greatest nutrition concerns for people considering veganism, it’s worth noting that “the water footprint per gram of protein for milk, eggs and chicken meat is about 1.5 times larger than for pulses” [21][22][23] with beef’s being 6 times larger. Leading to the conclusion that “it is more efficient to obtain calories, protein and fat through crop products than animal products.” [24][25][26]

But we don’t really need studies to tell us that eating animals requires more energy input and creates more waste than eating plants. How can it not?

Eating animals is incredibly inefficient. We are filtering our nutrients, our water, our resources, through someone else’s body. Globally, we’re feeding close to 40% of our grain to our food animals.[27] How can that not be worse for the environment than simply eating the plants ourselves? The United States alone could feed 800 million people with the grain we feed to our livestock. That’s more than the estimated 795 million people going hungry in the world today.[28][29] 98% of the massive water footprint for animal agriculture we just covered goes to growing feed crops for the animals we eat.[30]

I’m not suggesting that a global shift to veganism will automatically result in the proper redistribution of our crops to those in need, nor address the issue of unnecessary food wastage, but it’s the only way we can have enough food to feed everyone.

This is where many people point to small, local farms, and sustainable practices. Like grass fed beef. Or free-range eggs.

The thing is, we don’t have the land. There’s simply not enough land for the number of animals we eat every year. The amount of land that it takes to produce 37,000 pounds of plant-based foods will only yield 375 pounds of meat.[31][32][33]

The land required to feed 1 vegan for 1 year is 1/6th acre. It takes 3 times as much for a vegetarian, meaning someone who consumes dairy and eggs but no meat, and 18 times as much for a meat-eater.[34][35]

You can grow 15 times more protein on any given area of land with plants versus animals. On top of all of that, studies show that pasture-raised cows emit 40-60% more greenhouse gases than grain-fed.[36]

From “Vegan Food For the Homeless | Brown Paper Bag Movement”

Note: These excerpts are from a transcript of an interview with members of the Brown Paper Bag Movement. As such, it’s conversational, not a composed written piece, thus not always translated well to written form.

See the full video and interview transcript here
Find more posts about increasing accessibility
here.

I think it’s easy for people to assume that those who live on the streets will or even should take whatever they can get. But being homeless doesn’t remove ones humanity. Let’s hear about the reception the brown paper bag movement has had among the needy of New York City.

Jesse: Everybody is so excited, you know. A lot of these people are laying on the streets, you know, they have nothing. They’re laying there with no socks, no shoes. They have nothing to eat. They’re very happy and excited to get anything, and it’s heart-warming to be able to help [them]. You know, it really touches your heart and it inspires you to do it even more, because there’s so many people out there that need this. When they see somebody that is out there to genuinely help them, they open up, and they tell you about them, and it’s amazing to see all the stories and to connect with these people.

Miranda: We met a lifelong vegetarian. He’s been on the streets, and he was so happy and grateful to just be receiving good food. And one of the funniest things we’ve learned is that they have standards just like everybody else. Like, they don’t want to be eating bologna sandwiches. When we went out the first time, like they were telling us, “no, do you have any peanut butter and jelly sandwiches?” You know, they don’t want to eat that garbage either. So, that’s been the most beautiful thing: companies giving from the bottom of their hearts, not expecting money or anything in return, Just wanting people to just be fed, and it’s just so beautiful.

Matt: I offered a lady a bag, and she’s like, “No, I don’t want it.” I guess like, prideful. And I was like, “It’s vegan and it’s organic,” and she was like, “Really?! ’cause that’s all I eat,.” And we started to talk about factory farming, and why it’s important to eat organic. That gave me a lot of motivation, ’cause [someone] like her, who doesn’t have that many options, she can’t just like go shopping whenever she wants to, to still be, like, a stickler for what she puts in her body.

Miranda: This other company Acure Organics had sent us five hundred body washes, and one of the guys that we had given a bag to had opened up the bag and seen the body wash and he’s like, “Oh, my gosh thank you guys so much, like a lot of people donate stuff to us and I can never even accept anything ‘cause it’s all like poison and just chemicals.” And so he grabbed a whole bunch more body washes from us and, he’s like, “This is going to last me so long.” That was really memorable for me, just seeing that they do care about what they put in their bodies and on their bodies, and that is something that’s important, not just to us but to everyone, you know?

The Brown Paper Bag Movement reaches beyond the streets of New York City in raising greater awareness about food inequality, the marginalization of the needy, and a general consciousness-raising about extending compassion to all beings.

Jesse: We’re just trying to inspire people to give back to the community, help the less fortunate, and to seek enjoyment from helping others.  Not enough people in society want to help others. Whether it’s helping animals, whether it’s helping fellow humans, we need to get back to sharing and caring, with compassion and empathy for everybody. You know, it’s not just about your immediate family and friends, but everybody matters. Everybody needs help. With the Brown Paper Bag Movement, it’s been a great way for us to help the community, and these people really need it.  So I encourage anybody to, you know, go out there, whether it’s a Brown Paper Bag Movement, or it’s just you by yourself to try to help others, you know, a dollar, a sandwich, you know a bottle of water, anything. You know, people need these things. We need to not just drive by all these people but try to help them.

Zack: For us, we’re creating awareness for others–this is the whole planet thing. We need to all start showing compassion to everyone on the earth, you know?

Matt: They’re really special moments, even though it’s like, thirty or forty seconds that I spend with a less fortunate person who doesn’t have much. Just looking in their eyes, you see the despair on their face when nobody’s looking at them, they’re just walking past them.  But when you walk up to them and you’re like, “Hey man, could you use something to eat?” and it’s like, you just showed them twenty pounds of gold or something, and they’re just like, “Yeah man, thank you.”

From “Vegan In Venezuela On $30 A Day”

Note: These excerpts are from a transcript of an interview sisters Aurora and Kori who live in Venezuela. As such, it’s conversational, not a composed written piece, thus not always translated well to written form.

See the full video and interview transcript here
Find more posts about increasing accessibility
here.

On what they would you say to people who are in the lower ranges of pay? Do they feel that being vegan is still possible for them and what kinds of advice could they give to people who might want to explore going vegan but might not even have the amount of income that they have at this point?

Aurora: It’s actually cheaper to be vegan here.

Kori: Yeah

Aurora: Because one of the most expensive things to get are animal products.

Kori: Yeah, they’re very expensive here.

Aurora: Aside from beans that are also expensive here, you know, unless you queue and do all this process to get them at a regulated price. But it is actually a lot cheaper because vegetables are cheaper.

Kori: Exactly, it’s much cheaper to be vegan here and I would also recommend looking up what really is in nutrients, like in your food, because for instance we have a mango tree in front. The mangoes fall down, kids are constantly eating it so it’s very cheap. In fact, it’s for free, because…

Aurora: It’s in the street.

Kori: Yeah, it’s in the streets. We have mango trees growing all over the place. We also have avocados are incredibly cheap here.

Aurora: Because it’s very, it’s like a national product.

Kori: Yeah, so our bananas and stuff like that…

Aurora: They are literally on the street. You see people throwing rocks at the trees to make the ones that are ready to fall down and then you take them.

Kori: Yea, so actually I think what would be most important is not how much it is because it is completely cheaper. My Mom is always so shocked how little we spend on food. It’s just really educating yourself on what nutrients you actually need and where you can get them. We don’t have like almond milk, we don’t have tofu, seitan, none of that and yet I just got tests back because I went to the doctor for work and the doctor was like “You are an extremely healthy person” and we don’t even spend too much over our wages in food. We spend actually much less than most of..

Aurora: I would say that we spend at least 40% less than most people.

On the concept that if someone’s is in a country that is “poverty stricken,” as they’re sometimes labeled, trying to tell them to be vegan is ignoring the greater problems and issues they struggle with.

Kori: I think there is a YouTube video I watched where it is said that ‘Once you know the truth you can’t go back’. I can’t go back that’s just basically it and you’d think that the way a person was raised that this is another problem to throw on top of all my problems. This has solved some of my problems.

So, it hasn’t really been a throw on more trouble over your trouble. I went vegan overnight. It wasn’t even like OK. now I have to figure out what I’m going to eat, no no no, It was just like, well tomorrow I’m just not going to have any animal products and that was as simple as that.

I understand that if you were a mother with 5 kids to take care of and this is also an issue. I can understand where that I am privileged in that sense. But, I think for that mother it would actually help if somebody just told her ‘You can feed your kids a healthy diet and not have to queue for 45 to 3 hours a day to try and find enough animal products to feed them”. And also there is an issue in our country especially with so much poverty of cardiac issues and high cholesterol and stuff like that. And it also comes from people not realizing that they can get all these nutrients from better sources.

Proposed Solution

For the Chasing Genius Challenge, applications were asked to “Describe Your Solution.” Below is a summary of how the Transparency Projects would help address the mounting environmental crisis and help us collectively move towards truly sustainable living. Please also refer to the statement on the primary tab for more specifics on the Projects’ logistics.

Describe Your Solution

Everyone deserves to know the impact of their choices. Everyone deserves to have the opportunity to take action that is in line with their values, and chose not to support and engage in practices that decimate our planet, endanger our health and that of our family, take food from the hungry, and harm innocent beings.

While much of the legal and governmental documentation and regulations of the animal industries is publicly available, it’s made incredibly difficult to access and effectively navigate.

The public relies on media sound bites and distilled presentations that are rarely accurate. Most people do not have the time, resources, or ability to spend months researching in the depths of documentation, studies, legislation, investigations, and more.

The Transparency Projects—much like their sister endeavor BiteSizeVegan—will bring the information to the people in an accessible, approachable, navigable manner through location-based wiki-styled interface and mobile app along with a chat-like Q&A interface, putting right-to-know information right where it should be: at your fingertips, all together making accessing years of research as easy as clicking a map marker or sending a text message.



[1] “U.S. Could Feed 800 Million People with Grain That Livestock Eat, Cornell Ecologist Advises Animal Scientists | Cornell Chronicle.”

[2] “Hunger Statistics | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme – Fighting Hunger Worldwide.”

[3] “2015 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics by WHES.”

[4] Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability.

[5] Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops.”

[6] “Animal Industry Report Released by Iowa State Animal Science Department | College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.”

[7] Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops.”

[8] Robbins, Diet for a New America.

[9] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products.”

[10] Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, “Key Facts on Food Loss and Waste You Should Know!”

[11] Gustavsson et al., “Global Food Losses and Food Waste: Extent, Causes and Prevention.”

[12] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products.”

[13] The Water Footprint Network, “Water Footprint of Crop and Animal Products: A Comparison.”

[14] Hoekstra, “Water for Animal Products.”

[15] For example statistics, see the relevant portions of the following cited speech transcripts as well as the statistics provided in the bulleted list at the top of this page: Barwick, “The Extremism Of Veganism | Exposing The Greatest Lie [Speech] | Bite Size Vegan”; Barwick, “The Best We Have To Offer? | Inside Ireland’s ‘Humane’ Farming.”

[16] See the food accessibility resources linked at the base of the following posts as well as the information within each video post: Barwick, “Increasing Accessibility Posts.”

[17] Ibid.

[18] “Water Footprint of Crop and Animal Products: A Comparison,” accessed March 13, 2016, /en/water-footprint/product-water-footprint/water-footprint-crop-and-animal-products/.

[19] Arjen Y Hoekstra, “Water for Animal Products: A Blind Spot in Water Policy,” Environmental Research Letters 9, no. 9 (September 1, 2014): 91003, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/9/9/091003.

[20] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products.”

[21] Ibid.

[22] “Water Footprint of Crop and Animal Products: A Comparison.”

[23] Hoekstra, “Water for Animal Products.”

[24] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products.”

[25] WaterFootPrint.org “Water Footprint of Crop and Animal Products: A Comparison.”

[26] Hoekstra, “Water for Animal Products.”

[27] “U.S. Could Feed 800 Million People with Grain That Livestock Eat, Cornell Ecologist Advises Animal Scientists | Cornell Chronicle,” accessed March 12, 2016, http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/1997/08/us-could-feed-800-million-people-grain-livestock-eat.

[28] “Hunger Statistics | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme – Fighting Hunger Worldwide,” accessed March 12, 2016, https://www.wfp.org/hunger/stats.

[29] “2015 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics by WHES,” accessed March 12, 2016, http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm.

[30] Mekonnen and Hoekstra, “The Green, Blue and Grey Water Footprint of Farm Animals and Animal Products.”

[31] Dr Richard Oppenlander, Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work (Minneapolis, MN: Langdon Street Press, 2013), http://amzn.to/1QLqpvq.

[32] Johnny Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops,” n.d.

[33] “Animal Industry Report Released by Iowa State Animal Science Department | College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,” accessed March 12, 2016, https://www.cals.iastate.edu/news/releases/animal-industry-report-released-iowa-state-animal-science-department.

[34] Seeds, “Direct Seeded Vegetable Crops.”

[35] John Robbins, Diet for a New America: How Your Food Choices Affect Your Health, Happiness and the Future of Life on Earth Second Edition, 25th Anniversary Edition edition (Tiburon, California : Novato, California: HJ Kramer/New World Library, 2012).

[36] “AAAS: Climate-Friendly Dining … Meats,” Science News, accessed March 12, 2016, https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public/aaas-climate-friendly-dining-%E2%80%A6-meats.